Posts tagged history

Posted 2 weeks ago





These two were supposedly based on a real couple, who said they wouldn’t board a life boat as long as there were younger people still aboard the ship. They both went below deck, presumably to their room, and that’s the last time they were seen.

;________________;

Isador & Ida Straus
The couple had been married for 41 years at the time of the disaster. They raised six children together, and were almost inseparable. On the rare occasion that they were apart, they wrote each other every day. They even celebrated their birthdays on the same day, although they were well apart from one another. During the sinking, Titanic’s officers pleaded with the 63 year old Ida to board a lifeboat and escape the disaster, but she repeatedly refused to leave her husband. Instead, she placed her maid in a lifeboat, taking her fur coat off and handing it to the maid while saying, “I won’t need this anymore”. At one point, she was convinced to enter one of the last two lifeboats, but jumped out as her husband walked away to rejoin him.
When last seen by witnesses, they were standing on deck, holding each other in a tight embrace. Their funeral drew some 6,000 mourners at Carnegie Hall.
A monument to them still stands in a Bronx cemetery, it’s inscription reads: “Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it.”

why wasn’t the movie about them

why wasn’t the movie about them

These two were supposedly based on a real couple, who said they wouldn’t board a life boat as long as there were younger people still aboard the ship. They both went below deck, presumably to their room, and that’s the last time they were seen.

;________________;

Isador & Ida Straus

The couple had been married for 41 years at the time of the disaster. They raised six children together, and were almost inseparable. On the rare occasion that they were apart, they wrote each other every day. They even celebrated their birthdays on the same day, although they were well apart from one another. During the sinking, Titanic’s officers pleaded with the 63 year old Ida to board a lifeboat and escape the disaster, but she repeatedly refused to leave her husband. Instead, she placed her maid in a lifeboat, taking her fur coat off and handing it to the maid while saying, “I won’t need this anymore”. At one point, she was convinced to enter one of the last two lifeboats, but jumped out as her husband walked away to rejoin him.

When last seen by witnesses, they were standing on deck, holding each other in a tight embrace. Their funeral drew some 6,000 mourners at Carnegie Hall.

A monument to them still stands in a Bronx cemetery, it’s inscription reads: “Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it.”

why wasn’t the movie about them

why wasn’t the movie about them

(Source: beben-eleben)

Posted 2 weeks ago

Unlikely simultaneous historical events

tastyrepulsorboots:

sebpatrick:

quantumblog:

jkottke:

A poster on Reddit asks: What are two events that took place in the same time in history but don’t seem like they would have?

Spain was still a fascist dictatorship when Microsoft was founded.

There were no classes in calculus in Harvard’s curriculum for the first few years because calculus hadn’t been discovered yet.

Two empires [Roman & Ottoman] spanned the entire gap from Jesus to Babe Ruth.

When the pyramids were being built, there were still woolly mammoths.

The last use of the guillotine was in France the same year Star Wars came out.

Oxford University was over 300 years old when the Aztec Empire was founded.

I know it’s less of a shock if you read His Last Bow, but it does blow my mind a bit that there’s an entire collection of ACD Holmes stories that were written and published after World War I.

 (x)

Posted 1 month ago

why do we admire societies that threw 7 year old boys into the wilderness, and other ones that fed people to lions for fun?

metis-problems:

Are we the capitol? ._. 

Posted 1 month ago

Book of Kells Now Free to View Online

alldragonsconsidered:

This is the coolest thing I’ve seen for quite some time.  The artwork is breathtaking.  

Posted 1 month ago
Before [WWII], many men had been content to call themselves ‘queer’ because they regarded themselves as self-evidently different from the men they usually called ‘normal.’ Some of them were unhappy with this state of affairs, but others saw themselves as ‘special’—more sophisticated, more knowing—and took pleasure in being different from the mass. The term gay began to catch on in the 1930s, and its primacy was consolidated during the war. By the late 1940s, younger gay men were chastising older men who still used queer, which the younger men now regarded as demeaning. As Will Finch, who came out into the gay world of Times Square in the 1930s, noted in his diary in 1951, ‘The word ‘queer’ is becoming [or coming to be regarded as] more and more derogatory and [is] less and less used by hustlers and trade and the homosexual, especially the younger ones, and the term ‘gay’ [is] taking its place. I loathe the word, and stick to ‘queer,’ but am constantly being reproved, especially in so denominating myself.’

George Chauncey, Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940 (New York: Basic Books, 1994), p. 19.

well that certainly shakes up my assumption that ‘queer’ began as a slur and was then appropriated as positive. i don’t back every argument or linguistic decision in this book, fyi. but the evidence chauncey uncovered about the history of the word ‘queer’ is interesting.

(via fauxmosexualtranstrender)

Really interesting, especially in light of the radical feminist backlash against queerness.

(via blue-author)
Posted 1 month ago

queenofeden:

perplexingly:

Daughter of a gun (ノ´ヮ´)ノ*:・゚✧ No idea if such a thing existed but surely there had to be girls born on board in the Age of Sail?

*puts on obnoxious historian hat*

*clears throat*

there were actually tons of women and girls on board ships during the age of sail and it’s really cool history that no one!!! ever!!! talks about!!! 

like captains of merchant ships used to bring their wives and children on board for long voyages all the time (and of course there were plenty of well known female pirate ship captains, and women cross-dressing as men, and prostitutes that more people seem to know of)

there’s actually a really amazing story of one woman, Mary Ann Patten who was the wife of the captain of this ship called Neptune’s Car. Captain Patten decided that he wanted her onboard with him and she was super about this and learned all about navigation and sailing and everything. so this one voyage they’re going around the tip of south america when her husband gets sick and is bed ridden with a fever right as the ship sails into one of the worst storms any of the crew had ever seen and it looks like they might lose the ship or have to stop

so you know who takes over??? the first mate??? 

no.

MARY

she took over the whole crew and sailed that ship through freezing water and pack ice and had it coasting smoothly into the san francisco harbour like it was nothing. and she did this all at age 19. while pregnant.

at one point the first mate tried to get the crew to mutiny against her but they all rallied with her and told him to shut the heck up because she obv knew what she was doing.

there’s a great book about women in the age of sail called ‘female tars’ by suzanne stark that i cannot recommend enough and has way more amazing stories and insights about the myriad roles women and girls played aboard ship during that time period.

(sorry i totally didn’t mean to hijack your post i love all of your art and this is gorgeous i just got over excited sorry sorry sorry)

Posted 1 month ago
Everywhere else the government restores the nations they defeat in wars. Do you know why the Indian nations, the proudest people in the whole world, were never restored? Do you know why? You, all you white faces, do you know? The answer is simple, see how dumb white people are. This is the answer, listen now, because we were never defeated, never defeated, that is the answer…

Sitting Bull, from “Custer on the Slipstream”, by Gerald Vizenor

this passage was striking both for its explicit political message and because it’s pretty true: when the US goes in and invades Iraq or Afghanistan, after they win they give the country back to Afghan politicians (at first hand-picked, then elected). after World War II, Germany was restored to a civilian government (or at West Germany was).

but not indigenous nations.

(via fralusans-ana-marein)

but neither WWII nor Afghanistan were fought because Americans wanted to settle in Germany / Afghanistan, of course no American administration was left behind after the war - a better comparison might be with, for example, (Northern) Bukovina - settling there was one of the reasons why the Soviet Union entered the war (it was one of the demands in Molotov-Ribbentrop) so after the war it wasn’t returned to Romania (instead the Romanian population was forced out while Ukrainians moved in)

(via poesizing)

fair; the underlying point identified here (although not explicitly by Vizenor) being that there is a difference between settler colonialisms and other forms of imperialism or colonialism (and between military activity related to settler colonialism and other kinds of military activity).

Posted 1 month ago
the absolute best part is that in europe for CENTURIES they just let their shit hang around and din't take baths, they just let shit fill up the place and just be everywhere, covered in their own shit, and it took ages for someone to theorize this wasn't that good and the health of europe skyrocketed but before that actual shit was all over the place and they were just covered in it (and their first sewers were pathetic and shit)
xbox-one-official asked

shitrichcollegekidssay:

I’m sorry but like literally doctors dressed up like this

as a form of protection against epidemic disease. This is essentially the medieval European equivalent of a hazmat suit. Their ‘medicine’ was perfume and incense. That was their solution to the plague: bloodletting, frogs, and and posies of herbs (as protection to ward off the smell of the disease).

Like, everything smelled so bad they though disease was transmitted by foul odors. I’m not even kidding.

The nose half a foot long, shaped like a beak, filled with perfume with only two holes, one on each side near the nostrils, but that can suffice to breathe and to carry along with the air one breathes the impression of the drugs enclosed further along in the beak … They also put mud in their trousers to keep the tumors away.

THEY PUT FUCKING MUD IN THEIR PANTS. ON PURPOSE.

Posted 1 month ago

heteroic:

glowcloud:

blogoftheplanetoftheapes:

bronte-saurous:

punkrockluna:

bunreal:

bunreal:

ANNE FRANK WAS BI

HOW DID NO ONE EVER TELL ME THIS

I FEEL FUCKING ROBBED

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_bisexual_people:_A-F#cite_note-221

!!!!!!!!!!

Excuse me while I memorize this list

I keep trying to tell people this but nobody believes me.

haha yea they edited bits of her diary out which included anne expressing attraction to girls and it’s even been banned from schools because of this!! fun fact

Looked this up and yeah it’s legit!

Unconsciously, I had these feelings even before I came
here. Once when I was spending the night at Jacque's, I could
no longer restrain my curiosity about her body, which she'd
always hidden from me and which I'd never seen. I asked her
whether, as proof of our friendiship, we could touch each
other's breasts. Jacque refused.

I also had a terrible desire to kiss her, which I did.
Every time I see a female nude, such as the Venus in my art
history book, I go into ecstasy. Sometimes I find them so
exquisite I have to struggle to hold back my tears. If only I
had a girlfriend!"
Posted 1 month ago

historical-hatred:

animetcetera:

Chivalry is dead and feminism killed it.

Nah, try gunpowder and the rise of the merchant classes causing a social and military upheaval that led to a Germanic feudal idyll that was never more than a notion seldom thought of outside of poetry being sidelined and forgotten, only to be dug up again and romanticised in the Victorian period, but again never more than a seldom-practised idyll. Some utopian concept of the ‘good’ knight; the ‘good’ feudal butcherer, the ‘good’ imperialist-cum-gentleman (read: ‘the kind thug’, ‘the noble killer’).

Posted 1 month ago
I'm curious about your post on the V&A figurines: you said it's safe to assume that they represent British people of African descent, but the style of dress on many of the figures is decidedly not British (the colours and prints, some styles as well). It seems to me they might represent an increasing tendency towards othering in a much broader (and inaccurate) way—i.e they show a more generic tendency to exotify the other rather than showing any direct visual influence from Black British people
rj-ames asked

medievalpoc:

"Decidedly not British"???? Uh…no.  [link for reference]

I’d say they show exactly a generic tendency to exotify AND direct visual influence from British people. As for the clothing, this jacket and cravat, hose and hat:

and this jacket (from an actual British portrait):

are basically the same thing. The cuffs got smaller as the fashion changed, but it’s more or less the same outfit. You can see the similarities to this postillion’s clothing as well (1730s):

The patterns on the clothing of the figures is definitely meant to be more ornate and “exotic” than what a servant would usually wear, but that’s because they’re British dessert figurines. The style and construction of the clothing is the same.

^These ones even have a similar patterns:

Just because the people are Black doesn’t make the clothing LESS British, or at least European. The only figure with a more “fantasy” outfit is this one:

And it’s just basically a made-up outfit, which you can find on other fantasy-inspired dessert figurines with white people:

If they even have an outfit. Being Black doesn’t mean they’re less British.

Posted 1 month ago

tariqk:

8bit-anarchy:

disappointingpopsiclejokes:

Disappointing Popsicle Jokes

Historically accurate Popsicle Jokes

Oooh.

Posted 1 month ago

girljanitor:

bashi-bazouk:

peppercyanide:

sisterwolf:

via

I never even

c

wow

How did they get away with that

AH

I LOVE THIS

What do you mean how did they get away with it?

History isn’t one straight line progressing towards a liberal society.

Look how much Americans attitudes have changed between 1980 and today. 1980 was the first time most very religious people voted, they abstained before that at the behest of their churches. Now they dictate policy at every election.

In my family photo album there are pictures from the 20s of a woman called ‘uncle bob’. She dressed in men’s clothing, and had a ‘companion’. This was a rough industrial town, they were working class, nobody cared. It was her business.

This is why politics is important - the moment you think everything is better today than it was in the past, you let other people take control of the direction society goes in - with you sitting back presuming we’re going forwards.

reblogging for the commentary

Posted 1 month ago

On the commonly misattributed Emma Goldman quote “If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution”

organt:

"If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution" a quote frequently attributed to anarcho-feminist icon Emma Goldman, never actually appears in any of her work. It was invented by anarchist printer Jack Frager in 1973 for a series of t-shirts, a paraphrase of a longer paragraph from Goldman’s autobiography Living My Life:

At the dances I was one of the most untiring and gayest. One evening a cousin of Sasha, a young boy, took me aside. With a grave face, as if he were about to announce the death of a dear comrade, he whispered to me that it did not behoove an agitator to dance. Certainly not with such reckless abandon, anyway. It was undignified for one who was on the way to become a force in the anarchist movement. My frivolity would only hurt the Cause. I grew furious at the impudent interference of the boy. I told him to mind his own business. I was tired of having the Cause constantly thrown into my face. I did not believe that a Cause which stood for a beautiful ideal, for anarchism, for release and freedom from convention and prejudice, should demand the denial of life and joy. I insisted that our Cause could not expect me to become a nun and that the movement would not be turned into a cloister. If it meant that, I did not want it.

more

Posted 2 months ago

blacksmithswidereye:

Approximately 8,000 years ago a man carved this. The giraffe is life size.

And we know it was a man and not someone of another gender because…..?