Posts tagged history

Posted 17 hours ago

Women in GLF [the Gay Liberation Front, an organization Rivera co-founded] were uncomfortable referring to [Sylvia] Rivera – who insisted on using women’s bathrooms, even in City Hall – as “she.” The pressure mounted. The year 1973 witnessed a clash that would take Rivera out of the movement for the next two decades. As her lifelong friend and fellow Stonewall veteran Bob Kohler recalled, “Sylvia left the movement because after the first three or four years, she was denied a right to speak.”

The breaking point came during the Pride rally in Washington Square Park after the 1973 Christopher Street Liberation Day march. To the dismay of Lesbian Feminist Front (LFL), drag queens were scheduled to perform. As LFL passed out flyers outlining their opposition to the “female impersonators,” Rivera wrestled for the microphone held by emcee Vito Russo, before getting hit with it herself. Rivera later explained, “I had to battle my way up on stage, and literally get beaten up and punched around by people I thought were my comrades, to get to that microphone. I got to the microphone and said my piece.” Rivera complained that the middle-class crowd cared little to nothing about the continued harassment and arrest of street drag queens. Bleeding, Rivera screamed, “Revolution Now!” and lend the crowd in a chant of “Give me a G, Give me an A, Give me a Y … What does that spell?” Barely audible, her voice breaking, she groaned, “GAY POWER.” Russo later recalled that only the sudden appearance of Bette Midler averted outright violence, as trans opponents and supporters battled over the mike. Midler, having listened to what was happening on the radio in her Greenwich Village apartment, rushed to the scene, wrested control of the mike, and started singing “Friends.” Rivera would not return to formal queer organizing for some two decades.

Benjamin Shepard, “Sylvia and Sylvia’s Children: The Battle for a Queer Public Space,” That’s Revolting! (ed. Matt Bernstein Sycamore)

Interesting history here, she almost killed herself but Marsha talked her down.

(via daughterofprometheus)

(Source: transfeminism)

Posted 3 days ago

catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.

Posted 4 days ago

Learning about Wall Street

fralusans-ana-marein:

sofriel:

So Wall Street got its name from a wall the settlers built after some of them massacred a bunch of the Native people who lived there, who then got understandably pissed and started attacking them

then it became the first market of enslaved Africans and Indians in New York

and also is the site of the largest colonial-era burial ground of enslaved Africans

and this is literally what the American financial sector, much of which got its wealth from slavery and colonization to begin with, is based on.

#you cannot begin to redeem a nation whose literal foundation is oppression #without first recognizing that foundation and then destroying it and creating a new one #history

Posted 4 days ago

divanoid:

yellow—ranger:

do not let white academia fool you into thinking that

  • the greatest authors that were and ever will be are white men
  • every great philosopher came out of europe
  • mathematics and science were at their highest point when used by white men
  • the most beautiful city in the world is paris
  • colonialism was a golden age
  • europe is the pinnacle of civilization

Sources timmmme.

Some Written Works (That Aren’t By White Dudes)

  • Iola Leroy (about a biracial Black woman in the antebelleum South) - Frances E.W. Harper, who was one of the first published Black authoresses
  • The Space Traders (a very relevant short about Black life/value in less-than-utopian America) - Derrick Bell, Black sci-fi author
  • Thiruppavai (Tamil Vaishnava verses by the 12 Alvars, or poet-saints) - Andal, the only woman among them. These are still recited in South India during Margazhi
  • The Other Side of Paradise (memoir of) - Staceyann Chin, whose identity as Black-Chinese and lesbian in Jamaica is definitely worth reading about
  • Brown Girl in the Ring (post-apocalyptic Toronto WHERE PoC survive, featuring voudoun!) - Nalo Hopkinson; check it all out
  • The Bluest Eye - Toni Morrison, Black American novelist, Peace Prize winner and quality human being
  • Ninth Ward (children’s novel of Katrina through a black girl’s perspective) - Jewell Parker Rhodes
  • The Island of a Thousand Mirrors (about two families caught in the Tamil-Sinhala divide, based on her experience during the civil war) - Nayomi Munaweera, Sri Lankan author. VERY AMAZE.

Philosophers

  • Frantz Fanon, Caribbean philosopher/revolutionary who dedicated much time to decrying colonization, fighting oppression and telling white folks OFF; works include Black Skins, White Masks, Wretched of the Earth, and National Culture and the Fight for Freedom
  • En Hedu’ana, Sumerian en-priestess whose poetry composed one of the first written belief systems; also an accomplished astronomer
  • Ban Zhou, 1st-century Chinese historian, author (Lessons for Women, co-published The Book of Han)  and court advisor who advocated for domestic equality and women’s education. Her Confucian ideals were present in most written works

Playwrights

  • Zitkala-Sa, Native (Sioux) author (Old Indian LegendsAmerican Indian Stories), musician and activist who co-wrote The Sun Dance in 1913, an opera which showcased her knowledge of Ute and Sioux harmonies and composition. It was the first of its kind, featuring many indigenous performers
  • Yukio Mishima, Japanese author famous for Confessions of a Mask; also genius playwright who created Five Modern Noh Plays
  • Lorraine HansberryBlack (queer) playwright whose works SHOULD be acclaimed the world over (A Raisin in the SunThe Sign in Sidney Brustein’s Window)

Mathematicians/Scientists/Innovators

  • Muhammad Musa al-Khwarizmi (origin of ‘algorithm’), 8th-century Persian scholar, creator of algebra and pioneer of the quadratic equation; one of the first to use zero as a placeholder, his research brought Hindu-Arabic numerals and decimals into the West
  • Banu Musa [Ahmad, Muhammad and Hasan], a trio of Persian brothers/mechanics/mathematicians who wrote The Book of Ingenious Devices in 850: an illustrated guide on more than 100 tools and their use (from early feedback controllers to valves and float chambers; steampunk gods, I say)
  • 15th century Korea - first “turtleboats”
  • Garrett Morgan, Black inventor credited for the first traffic signal and patented gas mask in the ‘20’s
  • Sarah E. Goode, inventor and the first Black woman to earn a U.S. patent, for the folding cabinet bed so prominent in the late 1800’s and early-mid 1900’s
  • Madam C.J. Walker, Black entrepreneur and inventor famously known for her scalp conditioners, hair growth and beauty products; first woman millionaire in America (YAAAS)
  • Mary Kenner, creative Black patenter whose contributions range from the toilet-tissue holder to the sanitary belt (thank youuu!!)
  • Marie Van Brittan Brown, Black inventor of the closed circuit TV security patent (basis for modern surveillance, traffic control)
  • Philip Emeagwali, Nigerian scientist/inventor that innovated a supercomputer for petroleum fields analysis
  • 7th century India - invention of chess
  • Gebisa Ejeta, Ethiopian geneticist/agriculturist who invented the first drought-tolerant sorghum hybrid in Sudan; is now on the  Board for International Food and Agricultural Development
  • Benjamin Banneker, Black astronomer and mathematician who made America’s first functioning clock, y’all
  • David Unaipon, famous Aboriginal preacher/inventor who provided basis for modern shears and the centrifugal motor
  • 12th century China - first magnetic compass
  • Ellen Ochoa, Chicana scientist who invented optical analysis systems and was the world’s first Latina astronaut
  • Prafulla Chandra Ray, Indian chemist and entrepreneur who made first chemical factory in the country FROM HIS HOUSE; founded Bengal Chemical and Pharmaceutical Works
  • Sandrine Mubenga, Congolese engineer working on solar-powered villages and fuel-cell hybrid car (women in STEM!)
  • Shirley Jackson, kick-ass Black physicist, inventor and president at Rensselaer Polytechnic. She can be credited for the touch-tone telephone, the portable fax, and caller ID
  • Tony Hansberry, the youngest on this list; his innovation on endo switches drastically cut the performance time for hysterectomies (open-heart surgery).

So…what’s up, white academia? Where’s the accolades for them?

Posted 5 days ago

medievalpoc:

kyraneko:

medievalpoc:

frank-e-shadow-tongue:

supernatasha:

part-ofthecult:

Hogwarts Founders
» Idris Elba // Lucy Liu // Hrithik Roshan // Angel Coulby

While I do love that whoever made this did a good job matching actors to characters, the one issue I have is that Hogwarts is in England and what founded several centuries ago. I’m not saying that there wouldn’t have been blacks or asians in England at the time, but it’s still a historical inaccuracy to depict them as anything other than white Englishmen, since the culture of England at the time wouldn’t have had room for blacks and asians as anything other than slaves or traders.

Please don’t take this as me being racist, this is just me with a debilitating and incurable need for historical accuracy.

So let’s see. The Sorting claims it’s origins about a thousand or so years ago in it’s song, which implies the 1000s. JK Rowling described them as “medieval," which is about 500 to 1500, again agreeing with our 1000 date. So let’s work with that. We’ve got a pretty decent timeline to work with here. 

There have been black people in Scotland since “classical times,” and black moors present in James IV’s royal court in the 1500s, plus there’s St. Deiniol in Wales in the 500s, implying black people were also in the religious court instead of all just slaves and servants. Therefore, could a strong and fearless future-Gryffindor have ancestry native to the Isles? Hmmm.

Hannibal of Carthage was definitely not white (at least not in the modern sense). As a matter of fact, many Mediterranean descended people are mixed with Central Asians, South Asians, and North Africans so… But anyway, in 1555, black men were learning to be interpreters in London to help with trading in the Ghanian region. Here’s a coat of arms with black people on it dated 1616. Also, literally how do you not know about Dido Elizabeth Belle, an aristocratic lady of Scotland from the 1700s???

The Romani migrated out what is now modern day India and Pakistan in about the 1000s, so add in that they’re wizards who can fly and all that jazz, they could’ve easily gotten there within a year or two and settled in Scotland once they learned white people weren’t treating them very kindly. There you go, that’s how a South Asian Slytherin made it to Scotland just in time to found Hogwarts.

Here’s desi people of color from the Indian subcontinent, called Lascars, who had been sailing in Europe from as early as the 1400s, possibly earlier, still fitting that there could’ve been wizards in the British Isles about a hundred or so years earlier. Art from the 1600s showing brown men in turbans. Here’s an Indian man who in the 1700s ran a successful restaurant in England and taught white people to shampoo their hair lol.

Japanese emissaries came to Europe as early as 1584 and observed there were already Chinese and Japanese slaves among the overwhelmingly black slaves, something blamed on Christianity, which was part of the reason why Japan vehemently became isolated from that point.

Also about East Asia, Mongolian Genghis Khan made it to about Poland-ish in the 1200s, so it’s not a far bet to say the Chinese (who were also conquered by Khan on his way to Europe) could’ve found their way to Scotland around that time or a few hundred years earlier. Along with a smart cookie who would go on to be the founder of Ravenclaw.

Native Americans, of course, have been present in Europe for a while. In the 1500s, Manteo and Wanchese arrived in London. There’s evidence the Vikings and Indigenous Americans were friendly long before when Columbus blah blah, and there’s even evidence of Native Americans in Holland that’s like 2000 years old. Could a kind and loyal future Hufflepuff be one of those mixed race indigenous American-Africans?

ALSO considering the fact that Binns (the history professor at Hogwarts) specifically stated that witches and wizards were being persecuted and Hogwarts was built out of sight of Muggle eyes, it’s completely possible that POC came to Scotland and built the castle happily for other magical humans to have a safe place. Since HP universe is a fantasy anyway, read these article while you’re at it.

So yeah, I understand your implication that you don’t want to be racist or anything like that (bc being called racist is ofc so much worse than actually being ignorant), but POC were not just traders and slaves in the British Isles, they were a fuckton of other things your history books aren’t telling you (or trying to intentionally steer you away from). So me having an all-brown cast for a location in a dominantly-white place I’m sure is irking the fuck out of you, and that makes me so glad to see you confronted with that “incurable” need for historical accuracy you have.

And check out this rad blog: Racebending Harry Potter.

how come the only time people mention the enslavement of black people in Europe is when they want to deny our presence in fantasy fiction?

And that’s what it really boils down to pretty much every time.

Because someone couldn’t deal with a single photoset with characters of color in a FANTASY setting. None of the “fact checking” is really necessary, because that isn’t really the issue. Fantasy fiction isn’t something that should be subject to “proof”, but when it comes to racial diversity, it invariably is every time.

It’s my hope that with Medievalpoc, this endless quibbling about what is and is not “historically accurate” can be done away with, and Toni Morrison’s quote here can become creative people of color’s realities:

image

I love how the OP is “not racist, just suffering from a need for historical accuracy” and yet feels the need to piss on somebody’s fantasy fancasting, not about the plausibility of wizards who almost certainly didn’t exist but about the plausibility of people of color who not only did exist but demonstrably did exist there.

Telling people that they can’t have fiction about people like them because you need “historical accuracy” in their fantasy is, at best, selfish as fuck; treating people of color like anything they produce is yours first and foremost, not theirs, is well into racism territory, both in what it does to them and that you feel you can and should do it.

Also, citing a need for historical accuracy to support a very simplistic, naive, utterly unresearched position that boils down to “my assumptions make sense to me so nothing else could ever be right” plus “it can’t have been different from what I think because nobody ever told me” is self-servicing bullshit. Historical accuracy means you look at what IS rather than just assuming what you want to see. Granted, history is historically shitty at this. OP is nothing new. But OP is also applying more stringent standards to someone else’s fiction than to hir own understanding of history. And that’s no good.

That’s a pretty good summation. And that’s the thing-none of this is really about history at all.

Posted 1 week ago

Oldest depiction of female form shows that modern archaeologists are pornsick misogynists : Reclusive Leftist

cannelledusoleil:

female-only:

plansfornigel:

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Female figurine from the Hohle Fels cave near Stuttgart, about 35,000 years old. Interpreted as a pornographic pin-up.

“The Earliest Pornography” says Science Now, describing the 35,000 year old ivory figurine that’s been dug up in a cave near Stuttgart. The tiny statuette is of a female with exaggerated breasts and vulva. According to Paul Mellars, one of the archaeologist twits who commented on the find for Nature, this makes the figurine “pornographic.” Nature is even titling its article, “Prehistoric Pin Up.” It’s the Venus of Willendorf double standard all over again. Ancient figures of naked pregnant women are interpreted by smirking male archaeologists as pornography, while equally sexualized images of men are assumed to depict gods or shamans. Or even hunters or warriors. Funny, huh?

Consider: phallic images from the Paleolithic are at least 28,000 years old. Neolithic cultures all over the world seemed to have a thing for sculptures with enormous erect phalluses. Ancient civilizations were awash in images of male genitalia, from the Indian lingam to the Egyptian benben to the Greek herm. The Romans even painted phalluses on their doors and wore phallic charms around their necks.

Image and video hosting by TinyPicIthyphallic figure from Lascaux, about 17,000 years old. Interpreted as a shaman.

But nobody ever interprets this ancient phallic imagery as pornography. Instead, it’s understood to indicate reverence for male sexual potency. No one, for example, has ever suggested that the Lascaux cave dude was a pin-up; he’s assumed to be a shaman. The ithyphallic figurines from the Neolithic — and there are many — are interpreted as gods. And everyone knows that the phalluses of ancient India and Egypt and Greece and Rome represented awesome divine powers of fertility and protection. Yet an ancient figurine of a nude woman — a life-giving woman, with her vulva ready to bring forth a new human being, and her milk-filled breasts ready to nourish that being — is interpreted as pornography. Just something for a man to whack off to. It’s not as if there’s no other context in which to interpret the figure. After all, the European Paleolithic is chock full of pregnant-looking female statuettes that are quite similar to this one. By the time we get to the Neolithic, the naked pregnant female is enthroned with lions at her feet, and it’s clear that people are worshipping some kind of female god.

Yet in the Science Now article, the archaeologist who found the figurine is talking about pornographic pin-ups: “I showed it to a male colleague, and his response was, ‘Nothing’s changed in 40,000 years.’” That sentence needs to be bronzed and hung up on a plaque somewhere, because you couldn’t ask for a better demonstration of the classic fallacy of reading the present into the past. The archaeologist assumes the artist who created the figurine was male; why? He assumes the motive was lust; why? Because that’s all he knows. To his mind, the image of a naked woman with big breasts and exposed vulva can only mean one thing: porn! Porn made by men, for men! And so he assumes, without questioning his assumptions, that the image must have meant the same thing 35,000 years ago. No other mental categories for “naked woman” are available to him. His mind is a closed box. This has been the central flaw of anthropology for as long there’s been anthropology. And even before: the English invaders of North America thought the Iroquois chiefs had concubines who accompanied them everywhere, because they had no other mental categories to account for well-dressed, important-looking women sitting in a council house. It’s the same fallacy that bedevils archaeologists who dig up male skeletons with fancy beads and conclude that the society was male dominant (because powerful people wear jewelry!), and at another site dig up female skeletons with fancy beads and conclude that this society, too, was male dominant (because women have to dress up as sex objects and trophy wives!). Male dominance is all they can imagine. And so no matter what they dig up, they interpret it to fit their mental model. It’s the fallacy that also drives evolutionary psychology, the central premise of which is that human beings in the African Pleistocene had exactly the same values, beliefs, prejudices, power struggles, goals, and needs as the middle-class white professors and students in a graduate psychology lab in modern-day Santa Barbara, California. And that these same factors are universal and unchanged and true for all time.

Image and video hosting by TinyPicHohle Fels phallus, about 28,000 years old. Interpreted as a symbolic object and …flint knapper. Yes.

That’s not science; it’s circular, self-serving propaganda. This little figurine from Hohle Fels, for example, is going to be used as “proof” that pornography is ancient and natural. I guarantee it. Having been interpreted by pornsick male archaeologists as pornography because that’s all they know, the statuette will now be trotted out by every ev psycho and male supremacist on the planet as “proof” that pornography is eternal, that male dominance is how it’s supposed to be, and that feminists are crazy so shut the fuck up. Look for it in Steven Pinker’s next book. ***

P.S. My own completely speculative guess on the figurine is that it might be connected to childbirth rituals. Notice the engraved marks and slashes; that’s a motif that continues for thousands of years on these little female figurines. No one knows what they mean, but they meant something. They’re not just random cut marks. Someone put a great deal of work into this sculpture. Given that childbirth was incredibly risky for Paleolithic women, they must have prayed their hearts out for help and protection in that time. I can imagine an elder female shaman or artist carving this potent little figure, and propping it up somewhere as a focus for those prayers.

On the other hand, it is possible that it has nothing to do with childbearing or sexual behavior at all. The breasts and vulva may simply indicate who the figure is: the female god. Think of how Christ is always depicted with a beard, which is a male sexual characteristic, even though Christ isn’t about male sexuality. The beard is just a marker. Or, given the figurine’s exaggerated breasts, it may have something to do with sustenance: milk, food, nourishment.

The notion that some dude carved this thing to whack off to — when he was surrounded by women who probably weren’t wearing much in the way of clothes anyway — is laughable.

Good lord I am so glad I took ancient art from a female professor.

Posted 3 weeks ago
In the 1890s, when Freud was in the dawn of his career, he was struck by how many of his female patients were revealing childhood [sexual] victimization to him. Freud concluded that child sexual abuse was one of the major causes of emotional disturbances in adult women and wrote a brilliant and humane paper called “The Aetiology of Hysteria.” However, rather than receiving acclaim from his colleagues for his ground-breaking insights, Freud met with scorn. He was ridiculed for believing that men of excellent reputation (most of his patients came from upstanding homes) could be perpetrators of incest.
Within a few years, Freud buckled under this heavy pressure and recanted his conclusions. In their place he proposed the “Oedipus complex,” which became the foundation of modern psychology… Freud used this construct to conclude that the episodes of abuse his clients had revealed to him had never taken place; they were simply fantasies of events the women had wished for… This construct started a hundred-year history in the mental health field of blaming victims for the abuse perpetrated on them and outright discrediting of women’s and children’s reports of mistreatment by men.

― Lundy Bancroft

(via proletarianprincess)

read this carve it into your brains permanently etch it into your skulls r e a d  t h i s

(via miss-mizi)

(Source: womensliberationfront)

Posted 3 weeks ago
thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.

This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

Posted 1 month ago

geekyangie:

factsinallcaps:

ONE TIME A GROUP OF NATIVE AMERICANS TOOK A MILITARY FORT ESTABLISHED BY THE ENCROACHING SETTLERS BY PLAYING LACROSSE.

THEY STARTED PLAYING AND THE BORED SOLDIERS CAME OUT TO WATCH THE GAME. WITH ALL THE SOLDIERS DISTRACTED, THEY HURLED THE BALL THROUGH THE OPEN GATE TO THE FORT, CHARGED AFTER IT, AND ONCE THEY WERE ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE THEY JUST TURNED AROUND AND LOCKED THE GATE. IT WAS AWESOME.

Fort Michilimackinac!  I’ve been there three times now and this story never ceases to amaze me. 

Posted 1 month ago

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.

This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.

Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.

[via Colossal]

Posted 2 months ago

onceuponatown:

Girl high school gymnastics and/or ninja training. From the good old days of syncronized exercise. Charlestown High School, Boston.1893.

I love the fact that these are clearly taken of girls who have stopped and held awkward ‘Look, we are in motion! Behold our athletic grace!’ poses because cameras of the time were awful about capturing motion…

Posted 2 months ago
harvestheart:

Sofija Jovanović, also known as the Serbian Jeanne d’Arc, joined the Serbian army under a male name upon the outbreak of WWI, early 1900s.   OjIkrsU

harvestheart:

Sofija Jovanović, also known as the Serbian Jeanne d’Arc, joined the Serbian army under a male name upon the outbreak of WWI, early 1900s.   OjIkrsU

Posted 2 months ago
deadrezkids:

Indigenous futurism

deadrezkids:

Indigenous futurism

Posted 2 months ago
do you know how the whole thing with 4chan started? I'm still rather confused
beautysnake asked

yakfrost:

It’s a big misconception that “most of Tumblr brought this on themselves!! wahhhh”

What really happened is this -

/pol/, the politics section of 4chan, posted a fake 4chan raid on /b/, the random section of 4chan, which was this

image

/pol/ was basically trolling /b/,  and in fact /pol/ actually despises tumblr politics, but apparently there were a few tumblr SJWs hanging around 4chan that actually saw this post and took it seriously and raided on July 4th.

What they didn’t expect is that they didn’t know how to work the 4chan website. 3 feminist threads were posted in /b/ and promptly banned, and that was the end of said “tumblr raid”

It’s not 4chan, but /b/ (random, a section of 4chan) responsing to this “raid.”

Their response was obviously to “”troll”” with gross images from various corners of the internet because they know how “”sensitive”” the tumblr community is about triggers - they often post disturbing pictures/videos of murder, gore, animal abuse, rape, and hardcore porn on their boards they are desensitize to so they basically dumped folders of that shit in what they believed to be the most visited tags.

now they are trying to do things like photoshop selfies on porn and post them everywhere - which they can get arrested for if reported, because it’s slander, sexual harrassment, harrassment and even possibly pedophilia/possession of child porn if the selfie was of someone underaged. i honestly didn’t care much about this raid until then.

so to conclude?

  1. /pol/ started it
  2. those few SJWs were stupid wandering into territory they didn’t know about
  3. i think /b/ was just as stupid to overreact and retaliate like they did because they acted like Tumblr was a hivemind of some sort that came up with this idea when most of us probably want nothing to do with 4chan

what’s really funny is that they were so butthurt by this “”raid”” they wanted to take it to this level lmao, but i don’t think they care, most of them are misogynistic MRA dudebro neckbeards that can’t spend a second away from the computer screen and are here to laugh at us

Posted 2 months ago

cracked:

There’s a pretty important detail our movies and textbooks left out of the handoff from Native Americans to white European settlers: It begins in the immediate aftermath of a full-blown apocalypse. In the decades between Columbus’ discovery of America and the Mayflower landing at Plymouth Rock, the most devastating plague in human history raced up the East Coast of America. Just two years before the pilgrims started the tape recorder on New England’s written history, the plague wiped out about 96 percent of the Indians in Massachusetts.

In the years before the plague turned America into The Stand, a sailor named Giovanni da Verrazzano sailed up the East Coast and described it as “densely populated” and so “smoky with Indian bonfires” that you could smell them burning hundreds of miles out at sea. Using your history books to understand what America was like in the 100 years after Columbus landed there is like trying to understand what modern day Manhattan is like based on the post-apocalyptic scenes from I Am Legend. #CrackedClassic

6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America