Posts tagged history

Posted 1 week ago
In the 1890s, when Freud was in the dawn of his career, he was struck by how many of his female patients were revealing childhood [sexual] victimization to him. Freud concluded that child sexual abuse was one of the major causes of emotional disturbances in adult women and wrote a brilliant and humane paper called “The Aetiology of Hysteria.” However, rather than receiving acclaim from his colleagues for his ground-breaking insights, Freud met with scorn. He was ridiculed for believing that men of excellent reputation (most of his patients came from upstanding homes) could be perpetrators of incest.
Within a few years, Freud buckled under this heavy pressure and recanted his conclusions. In their place he proposed the “Oedipus complex,” which became the foundation of modern psychology… Freud used this construct to conclude that the episodes of abuse his clients had revealed to him had never taken place; they were simply fantasies of events the women had wished for… This construct started a hundred-year history in the mental health field of blaming victims for the abuse perpetrated on them and outright discrediting of women’s and children’s reports of mistreatment by men.

― Lundy Bancroft

(via proletarianprincess)

read this carve it into your brains permanently etch it into your skulls r e a d  t h i s

(via miss-mizi)

(Source: womensliberationfront)

Posted 1 week ago
thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.

This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

Posted 1 week ago

geekyangie:

factsinallcaps:

ONE TIME A GROUP OF NATIVE AMERICANS TOOK A MILITARY FORT ESTABLISHED BY THE ENCROACHING SETTLERS BY PLAYING LACROSSE.

THEY STARTED PLAYING AND THE BORED SOLDIERS CAME OUT TO WATCH THE GAME. WITH ALL THE SOLDIERS DISTRACTED, THEY HURLED THE BALL THROUGH THE OPEN GATE TO THE FORT, CHARGED AFTER IT, AND ONCE THEY WERE ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE THEY JUST TURNED AROUND AND LOCKED THE GATE. IT WAS AWESOME.

Fort Michilimackinac!  I’ve been there three times now and this story never ceases to amaze me. 

Posted 3 weeks ago

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.

This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.

Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.

[via Colossal]

Posted 1 month ago

onceuponatown:

Girl high school gymnastics and/or ninja training. From the good old days of syncronized exercise. Charlestown High School, Boston.1893.

I love the fact that these are clearly taken of girls who have stopped and held awkward ‘Look, we are in motion! Behold our athletic grace!’ poses because cameras of the time were awful about capturing motion…

Posted 1 month ago
harvestheart:

Sofija Jovanović, also known as the Serbian Jeanne d’Arc, joined the Serbian army under a male name upon the outbreak of WWI, early 1900s.   OjIkrsU

harvestheart:

Sofija Jovanović, also known as the Serbian Jeanne d’Arc, joined the Serbian army under a male name upon the outbreak of WWI, early 1900s.   OjIkrsU

Posted 1 month ago
deadrezkids:

Indigenous futurism

deadrezkids:

Indigenous futurism

Posted 1 month ago
do you know how the whole thing with 4chan started? I'm still rather confused
beautysnake asked

yakfrost:

It’s a big misconception that “most of Tumblr brought this on themselves!! wahhhh”

What really happened is this -

/pol/, the politics section of 4chan, posted a fake 4chan raid on /b/, the random section of 4chan, which was this

image

/pol/ was basically trolling /b/,  and in fact /pol/ actually despises tumblr politics, but apparently there were a few tumblr SJWs hanging around 4chan that actually saw this post and took it seriously and raided on July 4th.

What they didn’t expect is that they didn’t know how to work the 4chan website. 3 feminist threads were posted in /b/ and promptly banned, and that was the end of said “tumblr raid”

It’s not 4chan, but /b/ (random, a section of 4chan) responsing to this “raid.”

Their response was obviously to “”troll”” with gross images from various corners of the internet because they know how “”sensitive”” the tumblr community is about triggers - they often post disturbing pictures/videos of murder, gore, animal abuse, rape, and hardcore porn on their boards they are desensitize to so they basically dumped folders of that shit in what they believed to be the most visited tags.

now they are trying to do things like photoshop selfies on porn and post them everywhere - which they can get arrested for if reported, because it’s slander, sexual harrassment, harrassment and even possibly pedophilia/possession of child porn if the selfie was of someone underaged. i honestly didn’t care much about this raid until then.

so to conclude?

  1. /pol/ started it
  2. those few SJWs were stupid wandering into territory they didn’t know about
  3. i think /b/ was just as stupid to overreact and retaliate like they did because they acted like Tumblr was a hivemind of some sort that came up with this idea when most of us probably want nothing to do with 4chan

what’s really funny is that they were so butthurt by this “”raid”” they wanted to take it to this level lmao, but i don’t think they care, most of them are misogynistic MRA dudebro neckbeards that can’t spend a second away from the computer screen and are here to laugh at us

Posted 1 month ago

cracked:

There’s a pretty important detail our movies and textbooks left out of the handoff from Native Americans to white European settlers: It begins in the immediate aftermath of a full-blown apocalypse. In the decades between Columbus’ discovery of America and the Mayflower landing at Plymouth Rock, the most devastating plague in human history raced up the East Coast of America. Just two years before the pilgrims started the tape recorder on New England’s written history, the plague wiped out about 96 percent of the Indians in Massachusetts.

In the years before the plague turned America into The Stand, a sailor named Giovanni da Verrazzano sailed up the East Coast and described it as “densely populated” and so “smoky with Indian bonfires” that you could smell them burning hundreds of miles out at sea. Using your history books to understand what America was like in the 100 years after Columbus landed there is like trying to understand what modern day Manhattan is like based on the post-apocalyptic scenes from I Am Legend. #CrackedClassic

6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America

Posted 2 months ago
tonidorsay:


Seizure of indigenous land, 1776-1887

There is a gif map going around that talks about the Seizures and Theft of Native Lands over the History of the US.
It is a good map, and well timed for the 4th.
It ignores, however, that those lands were seized before the US took them over, and that the genocide and devastation was not solely at the hands of a single nation, but many, part of a European history of colonization and Occupation that is still going on to this day.

tonidorsay:

Seizure of indigenous land, 1776-1887

There is a gif map going around that talks about the Seizures and Theft of Native Lands over the History of the US.

It is a good map, and well timed for the 4th.

It ignores, however, that those lands were seized before the US took them over, and that the genocide and devastation was not solely at the hands of a single nation, but many, part of a European history of colonization and Occupation that is still going on to this day.

Posted 2 months ago

nitanahkohe:

signs, Edgar Heap of Birds (Southern Cheyenne)

artist’s statement:

The oppression and slaughter of human beings by white American society does not only come from hatred; greed and potential impediment to economic growth also feed the frenzy to kill and destroy people of color and spirits that grow from the soil or move the surface that is our earth. It is therefore proper we inform the Minnesota public to honor those forty Dakota tribal citizens who were executed by hanging in Minnesota in 1862 and 1865 by order of Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson with the support of the citizens of Minnesota.

As a sign of respect, forty Dakota-English, red lettered metal signs were exhibited originally in 1990 in the earth in the business zone of what was called the Grain Belt.

This is a proud historical districts of the city of Minneapolis and the state of Minnesota that houses the grain and flour mills, canals, and facilities to ship out fruits to “American progress..”

It was the potential disruption of American commerce that cost Dakota people their lives. The Native tribes of the Upper Midwest were not allowed the sovereignty and dignity to provide for their own economic livelihood through hunting and gathering. The Native land base of this region, as in all America, was not given the right to exist intact in a prominent way and was automatically superseded by white invading immigrants and their hunger to cultivate and consume more of this earth.

As the forty signs are now offered in the Nash Gallery symbolically along the water called the Mississippi, which remains a highway for American business, we seek not only to extract profit from our surroundings. We also wish to honor life-giving force of the waters that have truly preserved all of us from the beginning, and to offer respect to the tortured spirits of 1862 and 1865 that may have sought refuge and renewal through the original purity that is water.

Posted 2 months ago

amnhnyc:

July is National Ice Cream Month! 

Pictured is dessert as the author Jane Austen would have known it in 1810. Only the most privileged English families served “ices”—frozen desserts made of fruit, sugar and water or cream. Cooks often pressed these concoctions into fruit- or flower-shaped molds to make frosty, alluring sculptures (as seen above). “For Elegance and Ease and Luxury,” Austen wrote while staying at the manor house of her wealthier brother Edward, “I shall eat Ice & drink French wine”—two exclusive treats that she did without at her own modest home.

Today, variations on the ice cream idea can be found around the world. Italians created gelato, which is similar to ice cream but with less butterfat. A Japanese confection called mochi ice cream is a ball of pounded sticky rice with an ice cream filling. Sorbets, frozen desserts made with sweetened water, have many variations, from Hawaiian shave ice to Indian chuski.

Posted 2 months ago

bisexualfandom:

it was really disappointing when i found out helen keller was a eugenicist, because, as a disabled woman, there was so much that i looked up to her for, one of them being her brilliant eloquence when discussing such vitally important issues such as women’s rights and laborer’s rights, as well as her part in helping found the ACLU, and her advocacy for socialism. 

but, it doesn’t change the fact that she was a eugenicist, and the fact that she publicly supported the euthanasia of a disabled child.

while her writings on the abolishment of horrific institutions like capitalism and poverty do seem invaluable, i think people need to take into consideration, before they post quotes of hers, or pictures of her [and so on], that there’s nothing more capitalistic and corrupt than systematically wiping out ”defectives” such as the poor, disabled people, people of color, sex workers, lgbtq people, &etc. by sterilizing them, forcibly institutionalizing them, and murdering them, because they did not ”contribute” to the maintaining of the ”right” kind of society. 

Posted 2 months ago

princessnijireiki:

victoriousscarf:

Cold War rhetoric is alive and well in the youth of the United States.

Also if you live in the USA you should probably know that the Cold War created in fact a lot of violence often backed by the USA to “contain communism” and by that we meant genocide was okay as long as you were a nationalist.

In other words: grading really depressed me tonight

Cold War rhetoric is one of the SPOOKIEST FUCKING THINGS, and it’s so alarming to look at how even media-wise we’ve backpedaled straight into propaganda, do not pass go, do not collect $200, to the point where ACTUAL COLD WAR MEDIA is s/t less ham-fisted about it, and is more self-aware, where the modern consensus is more of a catchall us vs. the “enemy,” MISSION ACCOMPLISHED THANKS TO GENOCIDE/WAR CAMPS/TORTURE/ETC. It’s really surreal to see from your peers and from younger kids, seriously.

Posted 2 months ago

nizzerd:

“I’m a black kid. Try to teach me about slavery without me feeling resentment towards white people.”


His face though…