Posts tagged hipster

Posted 11 months ago
nff7:

Good idea

nff7:

Good idea

Posted 1 year ago

starchildnirvana:

Me.

"Indian Costumes" are HURTFUL.

Dressing up in redface is hurtful. Wearing ‘war paint’ is hurtful. Dressing up as another race by wearing terribly stereotypical caricatures of what you think that race looks like is not appropriate. When you dress up like this and take photos like this it adds one more images to the ponderous pile of this shit that creates the pervasive cultural notion that this is what people should think of when they hear ‘Native American’ , and IT HURTS REAL NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLE. It creates, in the minds of the people that see you dressed like that, a stereotype - a caricature of what Native people do/should look like that erases us in reality and removes us from their perception of the modern world. It turns ‘Native American’ into someone wearing beads and headbands and feathers and face paint. It turns an ethnic, racial identity into a costume.

It is racism.

When you only speak about Native American people in the past tense, in certain contexts. When you only mention us as pertains to White history. When you depict us in stereotypical ways. That is how racist thought is cemented in your mind and the minds of others.

I am tired of cultural appropriation.

I am tired of having to constantly be an educator of people who largely don’t want to be educated who get self-righteously angry (And refuse to learn. And continue to be angry) when they’re confronted. I am tired of being -hurt- by racism. I am tired of people who claim that they love and admire ‘Native American Culture’ but in fact know fuck all about Pan-Indian culture or the fact that ‘Native American’ is a blanket term for hundreds of hugely disparate indigenous nations across two continents and that we do NOT have just one culture.

And before you argue that folks who dress this way don’t MEAN to be racist or that they’re just having fun, before your many white allies rally around to tell me how wrong I am and what a good person you are and how you are not a racist…know this:

Racism is not in your intent.

Your intent is immaterial in how racist your actions are.

This isn’t about you BEING a racist. It’s about you DOING A THING that is racist.

Your intent doesn’t change it. Your ignorance of its meaning doesn’t change it. It’s got nothing to do with you as a person and everything to do with the meaning of your action in the context of sociocultural history.

If you think that dressing up as a stereotype is somehow ‘celebrating’ anyone’s culture, that speaks to some really problematic shit in how you’ve been educated, what you’ve been exposed to, what you think you know about what Native Americans are and what we look like. And while it’s not your fault that the culture of your upbringing has handed you that shit on a silver platter and said ‘eat it’, and not your fault that you did eat it without knowing better, it’s still bullshit and it’s still hurtful. You have the Internet at your disposal. You can become educated as to what Native Americans really are like and what we really are about and why not only is that outfit that you put on not remotely like anything legitimately Native American - but that you CAN’T make a costume that’s legitimately Native American. Because we don’t all look alike. Because we’re people.

Let’s go back in time. Let’s go back to my kindergarten class where kids are doing that stupid hand-over-mouth ‘woo woo’ war cry shit at me. Let’s go back to elementary school, watching Peter Pan at the end of the year and getting reprimanded when I walk out of the room to sit in the hall during the ‘What makes the red man red’ song because I can’t fucking explain to the teacher why it makes me want to cry. Let’s go back to my girlscout troop, where one of the leaders is quoting that movie and saying ‘SQUAW GETTUM FIREWOOD!’ and getting huffy and offended when called out on it by my mother. Let’s go back to my middle school chorus that’s singing Colors of the Wind and listen to all the resultant comments from my classmates AND TEACHERS. Let’s go back to when I was fourteen years old and a car full of college-aged white guys drove by shouting ‘FUCK YEAH, POCAHOTNESS’ and making sexual gestures at me. Let’s go back to last year, when a coworker asked me why I was asking for a personal day and checked ‘Religious Observance’ when she knows I’m not a Christian- I told her it was for a powwow, and she wanted to come. I told her it wasn’t open to the public and she said ‘Then why even have one.’

Then why even have one?

THEN WHY EVEN HAVE ONE?

Let’s talk about the fact that NDN women are 3.5 times more likely to be raped. And that we are raped by a non-Native man in 86% of cases. 70% of the time, our rapist is white.

When people dress like this, they perpetuate stereotypes about native people, AND THEY UPHOLD AND COSIGN ALL THAT SHIT.

Posted 1 year ago

deluxvivens:

This is #real #natural #native #beauty.

Posted 1 year ago

deluxvivens:

ardell scalplock picspam.

still hotter than a festival busload of hipsters in headdresses.

Posted 1 year ago

deluxvivens:

Because BA said I should, I present elder Native men.

Stunting on hipsters since— well, forever.

Posted 1 year ago

deluxvivens:

One last post: Indians in powwow regalia that are hotter than any hipster in a headdress.

Posted 2 years ago

recoveringartist20:

Me-My Native American name is Bear Warrior Woman :)

This is not cute.

Depictions like this are hurtful.

Posing with a feather and some fabric wrapped on your head and giving yourself a ‘Dances with Wolves' inspired 'Indian name' is hurtful. Dressing up as another race by wearing terribly stereotypical caricatures of what you think that race looks like is not appropriate. When you dress up like this and take photos like this it adds one more images to the ponderous pile of this shit that creates the pervasive cultural notion that this is what people should think of when they hear ‘Native American’ , and IT HURTS REAL NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLE. It creates, in the minds of the people that see you dressed like this, a stereotype - a caricature of what Native people do/should look like that erases us in reality and removes us from their perception of the modern world. It turns ‘Native American’ into someone wearing beads and headbands and feathers and face paint, someone with a name in the genre of 'cool animal + occupation + gender'. It turns an ethnic, racial identity into a costume.

This is racism.

When you only speak about Native American people in the past tense, in certain contexts. When you only mention them as pertains to White history. When you depict them in stereotypical ways. This is how racist thought is cemented in your mind and the minds of others.

I am tired of cultural appropriation.

I am tired of having to constantly be an educator of people who largely don’t want to be educated. I am tired of being -hurt- by racism. I am tired of people who claim that they love and admire ‘Native American Culture’ but in fact know fuck all about Pan-Indian culture or the fact that ‘Native American’ is a blanket term for hundreds of hugely disparate indigenous nations across two continents and that we do NOT have just one culture.

And before you argue that you didn’t MEAN to be racist or that you were just having fun, before your many white allies rally around you to tell me how wrong I am and what a good person you are and how you are not a racist…know this:

Racism is not in your intent.

Your intent is immaterial in how racist your actions are.

This isn’t about you BEING a racist. It’s about you DOING A THING that is racist.

Your intent doesn’t change it. Your ignorance of its meaning doesn’t change it. It’s got nothing to do with you as a person and everything to do with the meaning of your action in the context of sociocultural history.

Please watch this video.

If you think that dressing up as a stereotype is somehow ‘celebrating’ anyone’s culture, that speaks to some really problematic shit in how you’ve been educated, what you’ve been exposed to, what you think you know about what Native Americans are and what we look like. And while it’s not your fault that the culture of your upbringing has handed you that shit on a silver platter and said ‘eat it’, and not your fault that you did eat it without knowing better, it’s still bullshit and it’s still hurtful. You have the Internet at your disposal. You can become educated as to what Native Americans really are like and what we really are about and why not only is that outfit that you put on not remotely like anything legitimately Native American - but that you CAN’T make a costume that’s legitimately Native American. Because we don’t all look alike. Because we’re people.

Posted 2 years ago

lettherebecramp:

C R A M P’s great big gallery of racism!

I am having far more fun with these than I should. >.> If you’re going to fight oppression, might as well do it in a way that makes you laugh, right?

Congratulations! You’ve all taken/posted terribly racist, super disrespectful photos that stereotype and marginalize indigenous cultures.

Posted 2 years ago
hello-cunt:

Squaybe (verb) - The act of getting so drunk you can’t remember if you were ar Jambi’s party or the pow-wow.

Despite evidence that you’re just a troll doing this on purpose, I’m going to attempt education - mostly for the benefit of spectators.
Depictions like this are hurtful. Dressing up in redface is hurtful. Wearing ‘war paint’ and war bonnets is hurtful. War bonnets are not a fashion statement. They  are not appropriate to wear to a party. Dressing up as another race by  wearing terribly stereotypical caricatures of what you think that race  looks like is not appropriate.
It is racist.
I’m not calling you a racist.
I’m saying that you took an action right there that is racist.
We are having the ‘what you DID’ conversation here, not the ‘what you ARE’ conversation. 
Your ignorance doesn’t make the action itself any less racist or less hurtful. Your intent is immaterial. Accidental vehicular manslaughter is different from homicide, but in  both instances, someone is dead. Thoughtlessly racist actions are like  that.
Cultural appropriation is hurtful. When you post pictures like that  one, you reinforce a social picture of how people think of Native  Americans. Of what people think when they think ‘Native Americans’. You  add one more picture to the giant collage of hurtful caricatures.
Cultural appropriation is not beautiful. It’s not cute. It’s not fun  for the people you’re hurting. It’s not excusable because you didn’t  know any better.
Check out some links:
Cultural Appropriation on Wikipedia
Native Appropriations
My Culture is not a Trend
Please take this picture down, and don’t take more like it. When you see your friends and associates and tumblr followers doing the  same kind of thing, speak out against it. This is racist and hurtful.
I believe that you can be better than this.

hello-cunt:

Squaybe (verb) - The act of getting so drunk you can’t remember if you were ar Jambi’s party or the pow-wow.

Despite evidence that you’re just a troll doing this on purpose, I’m going to attempt education - mostly for the benefit of spectators.

Depictions like this are hurtful. Dressing up in redface is hurtful. Wearing ‘war paint’ and war bonnets is hurtful. War bonnets are not a fashion statement. They are not appropriate to wear to a party. Dressing up as another race by wearing terribly stereotypical caricatures of what you think that race looks like is not appropriate.

It is racist.

I’m not calling you a racist.

I’m saying that you took an action right there that is racist.

We are having the ‘what you DID’ conversation here, not the ‘what you ARE’ conversation.

Your ignorance doesn’t make the action itself any less racist or less hurtful. Your intent is immaterial. Accidental vehicular manslaughter is different from homicide, but in both instances, someone is dead. Thoughtlessly racist actions are like that.

Cultural appropriation is hurtful. When you post pictures like that one, you reinforce a social picture of how people think of Native Americans. Of what people think when they think ‘Native Americans’. You add one more picture to the giant collage of hurtful caricatures.

Cultural appropriation is not beautiful. It’s not cute. It’s not fun for the people you’re hurting. It’s not excusable because you didn’t know any better.

Check out some links:

Cultural Appropriation on Wikipedia

Native Appropriations

My Culture is not a Trend

Please take this picture down, and don’t take more like it. When you see your friends and associates and tumblr followers doing the same kind of thing, speak out against it. This is racist and hurtful.

I believe that you can be better than this.

Posted 2 years ago

weetz:

THANK YOU NDNSURGENCY

Posted 2 years ago

An Open Letter To My Local Hipsters

kozamilion:

rpmfm:

Sigh.

Today in the neighborhood coffee shop, I spotted a poster made by a local designer for an upcoming music festival. Hence the sigh.

A tomahawk and feathers had somehow made their way onto the poster for a West Coast band consisting of three bearded white guys. As I stood in front of the poster, noting the word ‘primitive’ in the write-up below the piece, I looked over and saw a blond girl with a Pendleton-style bag and a guy wearing a knitted Cowichan sweater… or maybe a look-alike he bought at The Bay. Another sigh.

Editor’s note: the poster in question does not appear anywhere in the body of this post (though it was later shared by someone else, in the comments that follow); what images do appear here were taken from other sources as a way to illustrate the author’s general arguments. We’re sorry for any confusion this has caused. ]

Headdress a la hipster

Non-native hipsters, I know that native imagery is trendy right now, that your friends are wearing it and the blogs and magazines you read are telling you to join in the fun. But when you and I look at those dreamcatcher earrings at the mall, I’m pretty sure we see different things. So I’d like to take a few minutes of your time to share my perspective, as a real live native person. Maybe in exchange for wearing my culture on your chest, you could allow me to suggest a slight re-jigging of your fashion trend.

I come from a family of artists, so I appreciate the aesthetic value of our artwork. My family is full of carvers, weavers, dancers, and singers. I’m lucky that way. But it isn’t just luck that allowed these artforms to be practiced today, it is years of political struggle and resistance.

For close to 100 years, in an effort to get rid of “the Indian problem” in Canada, the Indian Act made it illegal for us to practice our traditions. You see, non-native hipsters, your ancestors wanted to obliterate us in order to clear up the land for colonial expansion, and getting rid of our artforms and cultural practices was at the heart of those efforts. It was only the mid-1950s that this was written out of Canadian law, so that my relatives were no longer imprisoned for using our masks, blankets and other regalia in ceremonies.

I know you probably didn’t learn this in school, but it is a part of the local history that accompanies native culture. Each Indigenous culture around the world has its own history of suppression, its own story of resisting attempts to obliterate them so that industrial capitalism could flourish. Hey, you in the sweater — do you know what it took to maintain Cowichan knitting practices in the face of residential schools, intense poverty and assimilative policies?

Separating native people from our culture, and the politics and history from the images, serves to erase us. It makes it easier for native people like me, and the woman who knitted that sweater, to remain marginalized and silent while our imagery becomes a consumer object as part of mainstream culture. This is an old tactic, part of broader political efforts to forget the history of colonialism upon which this country is founded. Sports teams, band names and brand names which use Indigenous words and icons contribute to turning a marginalized people into a commodity.

This separation of imagery from politics doesn’t just happen here at a local level, but internationally as well. My ancestor’s ceremonial masks are in museums in Germany, England and New York. Mini totem poles are being manufactured in China and then sold in tourist shops in Seattle, Honolulu and Toronto. In the 1800s, they used to put real, live native people on display as well, remnants of a supposedly dying race. But now it is only our hard-won cultural icons and practices, like dreamcatchers and sweatlodges, that are of interest.

So a tomahawk is not just a tomahawk. It is a symbol of my silence. It is a history of resistance turned into a symbol of cool, devoid of any meaning or political significance. As the write-up below the poster notes, images like tomahawks are seen as ‘primitive,’ as are the ceremonies, laws and ways of life native people still practice.

It is no coincidence that when I go to indie music festivals, I see a whole lot of Cowichan sweaters and not a lot of Cowichan people. Yet it is with great surprise whenever I see a native artist or native musicians – actual Indigenous people – included in such mainstream cultural events. It is not the norm.

Likely, many of you won’t care about all this: apathy has had a long-term love affair with consumerism. It’s a classic co-dependent relationship. But a few of you might ask why you should care, what’s in it for you?  Well, for starters, I am trying to save you some energy. Maintaining your hipster culture requires a significant amount of effort in order to deny or forget the history I’m talking about. And in fact, it is far from ‘history.’ On the West Coast, we are constantly reminded about the unfinished business of land claims in this province. The current struggle over the Juan de Fuca Trail is a prime example, where elders from local First Nations are speaking out against development.

Consumer culture depends on you divorcing the politics behind native imagery from the history of struggle it has taken for it, and us, to be here. This is an active forgetting, requiring you to spend energy keeping current issues separate and apart from the images you emblazon on your t-shirts, the ‘tribal’ designs you get tattooed on your shoulder or the native names you use for your bands (Geronimo being a good example).

It isn’t necessarily that there is a problem with wearing Indigenous art or symbols – in fact, my family’s success as artists depends on people like yourself buying their jewelry, t-shirts or masks. The challenge is maintaining a connection between the imagery and the practice of our cultural wealth (including artwork, language, ceremonies, and law) and the history and politics that have ensured their survival. So here’s what I suggest.

Why not take another trend and put it to use here – I’m thinking here about the local food craze. ‘Eating local’ involves creating connections on a small scale, lessening the distance between the ground where your food was grown, and your plate. It involves meeting your local farmer at the market, buying a potato they grew themselves and picked that morning, and eating it for dinner that night. Why not take these same principles and put them to work with native imagery and artwork? Rather than buying a Pendleton-style bag mass-produced overseas and sold at Urban Outfitters around the world, why not buy a t-shirt, sweater or earrings from your local Indigenous craftsperson. Meet them, find out where they’re from, and the history behind their particular craft. In the process, you will be educating yourself about local Indigenous history and political struggles, and putting food on the tables of local artisans.

I know this isn’t a complete solution to cultural appropriation, but it’s a start. And with this local approach, you’ll be better informed and can still look cool while doing it.

An excellent post by Sarah Hunt. Hai hai & hychga siem!

 

 ALL OF THIS.

Posted 2 years ago

http://moniquill.tumblr.com/post/10573048919/ijustforgot-moniquill-velocicrafter

rosencarousel:

The images and the argument made in defense of them, while I understand that there is a lack of intention to offend and a desire to make up for it, is still a lot of “white-splaining”. Even with one having been raised in an area that was predominantly native, it doesn’t excuse the appropriation, which is still what was done here. I was raised in a very Italian neighborhood, and as much as I love the culture and will participate in events in the Italian community, I’m not going to claim a right to Italian culture because of the setting of my childhood. It’s worse when “Italian” gets replaced by a culture that has been oppressed and appropriated for over 300 years and still is on their home soil. We all have rich cultural backgrounds and don’t need to take from another for a “richer” rp experience. If it’s a tribal romance the OP wants? The Irish actually have that in their history; she can take from there.

Also, another fun fact I was told about: even when a hipster says, “My great grandmother was Cherokee, so I’m just exploring my roots,” if you lack the desire to register that background with a tribe and to actually learn directly about those roots, you are still appropriating. You are using an ancestor you do not honor enough to fully follow in their footsteps to excuse a rather gross “fashion trend”. The same thing goes with armchair shamans. Why use a bad, appropriated spiritualism with the excuse of a Native ancestor when that Native ancestor’s blood grants you the right to try to register and learn the real religion from an elder? Animism abounds in the history of most cultures: why do you have to take from Native practices so badly? It’s very different from reconstructionalism, where you simply convert and do ages of research on what is an otherwise dead religion, and arm-chairing is not comparable to switching from Catholicism to Buddhism: you aren’t joining a tribe, you aren’t learning from the elders, but taking tiny bits of their culture and saying it’s your right.

I honestly can’t speak further on that, because I’m not Native, but just… as it was said, be polite and thankful when you’re invited to participate in another culture’s traditions, but don’t push it with appropriation. If it isn’t daily wear and if it seriously has a religious connotation, don’t do it, and if you aren’t sure, don’t do it.

(Source: ijustforgot)

Posted 2 years ago

ijustforgot:

moniquill:

velocicrafter:

custerdiedforyoursins:

booyam:

ijustforgot:

Day 3 at Anime North 2011. I wanted to let lose my Hipster side, and let it run free with Steampunk. Hipster+Steampunk= Native American Steampunk. I am just that awesome.

UGH. Please don’t do this to me. I love Cons. I love Steampunk. I AM Native American. Don’t use “hipster” as a reason to cosplay culture appropriation. Just.. don’t.

First thought: can’t wait to see what Moniquill has to say about this, haha.

Wow.

The best part is that Native + Steampunk doesn’t have to suck and be disrespectful. I guess she wanted to err on the side of crappy, tho?

What Moniquill has to say about this:

No, just no. Fullstop no.

I want to find this person and shake them SO SO SO SO MUCH. And then sit them down in a clockwork-orange type rig and make them view all of this:

Beyond Victoriana #50Overcoming the Noble Savage & the Sexy Squaw: Native Steampunk–Guest Blog by Monique Poirier

http://velocicrafter.tumblr.com/post/6958629930

http://www.racialicious.com/2008/09/18/cultural-appropriation-homage-or-insult

http://clairelight.typepad.com/seelight/2009/01/defining-cultural-appropriation.html

http://fuckyeahethnicwomen.tumblr.com/post/5806333921/an-ask-on-appropriation-vs-appreciation-reblogged

http://esprit-follet.tumblr.com/tagged/cultural_appropriation

http://velocicrafter.tumblr.com/post/7140429813/dressing-up-as-a-native-american-furthers-the

http://jhameia.tumblr.com/post/7597837306/adailyriot-grrrlfoxxx-ligidium

In fact, just all of: http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/cultural+appropriation

ijustforgot:

This was posted on my Tumblr;

 

I would like to thank everyone who commented on my Native American Steampunk. Especially those who commented ‘negatively’, particularly Monoquilliloquies(I read all your links!)

First off, I want everyone to know, I did not wear this outfit to cause disrespect to anyone. Especially to those who are Native American. I can assure you your comments are helpful to me, as I would like to wear a better Native American Steampunk costume someday.

(I would like to apologize for the ‘Hipster’ comment, I felt if I said it I wouldn’t be judged on my ignorance. I was mystaken.)

My family is from Ireland, right off the boat. Growing up as a child in a predominately Native community, I was the only fully white kid in my class. Grade 6 we had native studies, when asked if anyone was native; I was the only one who didn’t raise my hand. 

And yet with all of this beautiful culture surrounding me I was unable to become appart of it, as I felt I might offend. Which,  as you can see, I have clearly done. 

If you have any insite on how I can go about this; please let me know. 

For that past 5 years I have been attending my home town’s Pow Wow (you might have seen my photographs from this years), I attend them alone, and don’t know anyone who could help me dress/participate in these events. I only go as a spectator and enjoy the rich culture and wonderful environment that these Pow Wows bring. 

If someone would be willing to give me some pointers, I would appreciate it. 

Thank you so much,

Katie McNeill (ijustforgot)

I’m glad that you’re willing to sit and listen when you’re told that what you did was not ok, but I just want to point out that the following gave me serious pause:

For that past 5 years I have been attending my home town’s Pow Wow (you might have seen my photographs from this years), I attend them alone, and don’t know anyone who could help me dress/participate in these eventsIf you have any insite on how I can go about this; please let me know. 

You can’t.

These events -are not for you-.

You are not native. Even if you grew up in a predominantly NDN area. Even if you have peripherally participated in NDN culture(s) through immersion. You are still not NDN. You cannot be a part of NDN culture, because it is not yours. It is not who you are. Ethnicity isn’t something you can convert to.

You can attend powwows that are open to the public, and enjoy the food and the music and the dancers and the vendors; you can purchase native-made arts and crafts to use, display in your home, wear, whatever - we hugely appreciate it when you do because many of us make or augment our livelihoods in this way. Please, watch and participate and enjoy when you’re invited to do so.

But that’s all.

Because you are not NDN.

One of the greatest disservices that white privilege does to -everyone- is that people who have white privilege are led to believe that everything in the world is theirs to have.

This is not the case.

You’re looking for pointers on how to…what, exactly? How to appropriate better?

My advice: Just don’t.

No, really. Just don’t do it.

If you want to dress as a character who wears NDN attire, be prepared to have a backstory that explains why you, a white person, are wearing it (please not 'My character was adopted into X tribe!' either as a child or later in life or through marriage when they fell in love with a Badass Native/Chief’s Beautiful Daughter - that is the most overplayed Mighty Whitey bullshit fantasy ever and for fuck’s sake when, when, WHEN will white people get tired of it? I cannot tell you how many white people I have heard expound unto me thier Dances With Wolves or Little Big Man or Every Third Romance Novel With NDNs In It backstory. Shit gets old, and you do not have enough we-sha-sha.). Do some historical study on what characters might be likely to do this (fur trappers and prospectors come immediately to mind). Know that some things are never, ever ok to wear (war paint, feathered headdresses, ESPECIALLY war bonnets, specific religious symbols, etc.) and that evern of you think you’ve done all your homeworks, NDN people might still be pissed at you and that they are right to be so. If you’re not willing to do this, to take these extra steps, then just don’t do it

Stop and think about why you even want to.

From the above link:

"There is a long colonial history of playing Indian, of settler-colonists assuming Native roles and cultures for themselves. [3] Philip Deloria even wrote a whole book about it. While I will not go so far as to suggest that white authors cannot, or must not, write from allegedly indigenous points of view, non-indigenous authors, and most especially white authors, must be aware of (and think hard about) the colonialist tropes of playing Indian when they write from an alleged indigenous point of view.

There are two points about “playing Indian” and white people writing children’s books about indigenous people that I wish to bring forward.

In “A Tribe Called Wannabe" (pdf), Rayna Green writes about an incident when white historical re-enactors went through some trouble to learn how to play lacrosse, and even make "authentic" lacrosse sticks, in order to "authentically" re-enact the roles of historical Iroquois and Ojibway in a particular battle. When asked why they didn’t just invite contemporary Iroquois and Ojibway to play those roles — people who already had the relevant knowledge — the white re-enactors eventually admitted that the point of even doing the re-enactment was that they had wanted to play the Iroquois and Ojibwe roles themselves. Green writes (emphasis mine),

The need to replay the roles, replay the battles, replay the historic scenes is there, especially when the distance of time has not resolved the historical ambiguity about the actions of one’s ancestors, or when the reconstruction of the past seems more glorious than the present. … In that world, not only do Indians not play Indian, but the role for whites to play is not the one they want. They already know that role. It is the “Indian” they want and want to be.

When one lives in a settler-colonialist state, when one is ashamed of or conflicted about one’s settler privilege or the actions of one’s ancestors, it can appear to be emotionally simpler, easier, to identify with an indigenous viewpoint. “If I had lived then,” so many of these books and movies say, “I would have done differently. I would have been on the side of the Natives.” [4]

Almost always: would have done. Would have been.

Almost never: am doing.”

You’re Irish - you have your own lovely, rich, deep culture with its own fascinating history. You have your own ancestors. Go take an interest in THEM.

Posted 2 years ago

velocicrafter:

custerdiedforyoursins:

booyam:

ijustforgot:

Day 3 at Anime North 2011. I wanted to let lose my Hipster side, and let it run free with Steampunk. Hipster+Steampunk= Native American Steampunk. I am just that awesome.

UGH. Please don’t do this to me. I love Cons. I love Steampunk. I AM Native American. Don’t use “hipster” as a reason to cosplay culture appropriation. Just.. don’t.

First thought: can’t wait to see what Moniquill has to say about this, haha.

Wow.

The best part is that Native + Steampunk doesn’t have to suck and be disrespectful. I guess she wanted to err on the side of crappy, tho?

What Moniquill has to say about this:

No, just no. Fullstop no.

I want to find this person and shake them SO SO SO SO MUCH. And then sit them down in a clockwork-orange type rig and make them view all of this:

Beyond Victoriana #50Overcoming the Noble Savage & the Sexy Squaw: Native Steampunk–Guest Blog by Monique Poirier

http://velocicrafter.tumblr.com/post/6958629930

http://www.racialicious.com/2008/09/18/cultural-appropriation-homage-or-insult

http://clairelight.typepad.com/seelight/2009/01/defining-cultural-appropriation.html

http://fuckyeahethnicwomen.tumblr.com/post/5806333921/an-ask-on-appropriation-vs-appreciation-reblogged

http://esprit-follet.tumblr.com/tagged/cultural_appropriation

http://velocicrafter.tumblr.com/post/7140429813/dressing-up-as-a-native-american-furthers-the

http://jhameia.tumblr.com/post/7597837306/adailyriot-grrrlfoxxx-ligidium

In fact, just all of: http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/cultural+appropriation

Posted 2 years ago

Lmao people can suck it.

svnoyi:

kangarooey:

If you don’t like when a certain culture wears your cultures clothing or anything of the like, then don’t wear theirs.

For example,

I will not complain if I see a white girl wearing a Salvadoran dress if I have an American Outfitters shirt in my closet. 

I get that you may be offended, but I think you’re only entitled to feel offended if you 100% only wear the clothes from your culture. If you’re going to target the hipsters (although I hate their style) for wearing Native American clothes, I better not catch you wear anything that was intended for white people.

Practice what you preach.

Wow. It’s hard to know where to even start with this…

  • T shirts and blue jeans aren’t sacred, unlike warbonnets
  • Native Americans were forced to assimilate and wear white clothing, under penalties as severe as death. We WEREN’T ALLOWED to wear our own clothing on our own land. Thats PART of the reason it’s so fucking offensive that the kids of the people that pointed guns at us, screaming “kill the Indian save the man!” are now wanting to wear caricatures of the things that were taken from us.
  • Because white European culture is so dominant in our country today, we HAVE to dress in a western fashion for school, jobs, etc. Try wearing Native clothing (REAL Native clothing, not racist costume bullshit, though it would probably work just about as well) to a job interview….see how that goes for you. 
  • If you really can’t see how the power dynamic works here, making it absolutely mandatory for everyone in the west to dress in things “intended for white people”, then you are so woefully ignorant of how the world works that it is absolutely tear worthy.

(Source: thediyguy)