Posts tagged Quote

Posted 1 month ago
I am so tired of these leftist men, the ones who are smart and sensitive and funny and being all those things, who know exactly what buttons to push, what political buzzwords to use, what to say to manipulate the women around them into protecting them from accountability for their predatory actions because there are SO MANY of you
Posted 1 month ago
In the 1890s, when Freud was in the dawn of his career, he was struck by how many of his female patients were revealing childhood [sexual] victimization to him. Freud concluded that child sexual abuse was one of the major causes of emotional disturbances in adult women and wrote a brilliant and humane paper called “The Aetiology of Hysteria.” However, rather than receiving acclaim from his colleagues for his ground-breaking insights, Freud met with scorn. He was ridiculed for believing that men of excellent reputation (most of his patients came from upstanding homes) could be perpetrators of incest.
Within a few years, Freud buckled under this heavy pressure and recanted his conclusions. In their place he proposed the “Oedipus complex,” which became the foundation of modern psychology… Freud used this construct to conclude that the episodes of abuse his clients had revealed to him had never taken place; they were simply fantasies of events the women had wished for… This construct started a hundred-year history in the mental health field of blaming victims for the abuse perpetrated on them and outright discrediting of women’s and children’s reports of mistreatment by men.

― Lundy Bancroft

(via proletarianprincess)

read this carve it into your brains permanently etch it into your skulls r e a d  t h i s

(via miss-mizi)

(Source: womensliberationfront)

Posted 3 months ago
Poverty too, like feminism, is often framed as an identity problem. As though the poor had not been created by injustice but are a lost tribe who just happen to exist, and can be rescued in the short term by a system of grievance redressal (administered by NGOs on an individual, person-to-person basis), and whose long-term resurrection will come from Good Governance — under the regime of Global Corporate Capitalism, it goes without saying.
Arundhati Roy, Capitalism: A Ghost Story (via sociolab)

(Source: locusimperium)

Posted 3 months ago
In order to be a writer, you have to be at least a little sadistic. In most of your stories, at some point you’re basically trying to take the feelings of your readers and crush them.
Posted 3 months ago
‘Men say,’ Liz reaches for her scissors, ‘“I can’t endure it when women cry” — just as people say, “I can’t endure this wet weather.” As if it were nothing to do with the men at all, the crying. Just one of those things that happen.’
Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel (p92). (via romulanholiday)
Posted 3 months ago
A man once asked me … how I managed in my books to write such natural conversation between men when they were by themselves. Was I, by any chance, a member of a large, mixed family with a lot of male friends? I replied that, on the contrary, I was an only child and had practically never seen or spoken to any men of my own age till I was about twenty-five. “Well,” said the man, “I shouldn’t have expected a woman (meaning me) to have been able to make it so convincing.” I replied that I had coped with this difficult problem by making my men talk, as far as possible, like ordinary human beings. This aspect of the matter seemed to surprise the other speaker; he said no more, but took it away to chew it over. One of these days it may quite likely occur to him that women, as well as men, when left to themselves, talk very much like human beings also.

Dorothy L. SayersAre Women Human?: Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

Book Geek Quote #445

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

(Source: bookgeekconfessions)

Posted 5 months ago
Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson (via purplebuddhaproject)
Posted 5 months ago
Florence Nightingale was never called “The Lady with the Lamp” but ”The Lady with the Hammer,” an image deftly readjusted by the war reporter of the Times since it was far too coarse for the folks back home. Far from gliding about the hospital with her lamp aloft, Nightingale earned her nickname through a ferocious attack on a locked storeroom when a military commander refused to give her the medical supplies she needed.
"Who cooked the Last Supper?: The Women’s History of the World"- Rosalind Miles (via fyeahnursingthings)
Posted 5 months ago
The poison. The poison for Joffrey, the poison specifically chosen to kill Joffrey, Joffrey’s poison. That poison.

- Olenna Tyrell at some point, probably. (via elizabeth-hana)

(via faircommentfuckoff)

Joffrey: I WAS THE NICEST GUY IN ALL OF WESTEROS AND THEY RUINED MY LIFE FOR NO REASON

(via thefingerfuckingfemalefury)

(Source: katehawkingbirdbishop)

Posted 6 months ago
Posted 7 months ago
Posted 7 months ago
Terms such as “culturally deprived,” “economically disadvantaged” and “underdeveloped” place the responsibility for their own conditions on those being so described. This is known as “blaming the victim.” It places responsibility for poverty on the victims of poverty. It removes the blame from those in power who benefit from, and continue to permit, poverty.

Still another example involves the use of “non-white,” “minority” or “third world.” While people of color are a minority in the U.S., they are part of the vast majority of the world’s population, in which white people are a distinct minority. Thus, by utilizing the term “minority” to describe people of color in the U.S., we can lose sight of the global majority/minority reality - a fact of some importance in the increasing and interconnected struggles of people of color inside and outside the U.S.

To describe people of color as “non-white” is to use whiteness as the standard and norm against which to measure all others.

Robert B. Moore, “Racism in the English Language”

(via wretchedoftheearth)

Posted 7 months ago

Consider going into a classroom and looking around, and you’re the only man there. Even if you’re totally ok with that (heck, you expected it), you notice. You feel all the women in the room notice you and see that a lot of them are glancing over at you or making comments about your presence. Ok, you knew that might happen. A woman next to you says, “Hey, cool, a guy in a CS class, good for you.”

When it comes time to form a study group, half the women in the class don’t want to work with you because they assume men aren’t as good at CS. The other half jockey to work with you, some for the novelty (“Hey, I’m in a group with the guy, “) and half because they want to ask you out.

When you go to apply for an internship, a lot of companies seem really interested in you, but you’re not sure if it’s because they like your resume or just because you’re a guy in CS and they want to look open and forward thinking by having lots of male interns coding. You meet up with a group of female interns and one makes a slightly sexual joke. Everyone freezes and looks at you - are you one of those guys in CS that is serious and can’t take a joke, or will you be one of the girls?
At your job after you graduate, it’s naturally not ok for a woman to say outright that she’s prejudiced against male coders… But maybe your boss gives you slightly different work, or it takes longer for you to get a promotion because they need more proof that you are good - you don’t get the benefit of the doubt the way the girls do. When you express a strong opinion about a tough problem, the women write it off as you being sensitive and emotional - men often are, you know. When discussing your career ambitions, your coworkers often ask you how children play into that - I mean, you’re probably looking for a wife and plan to have kids since you’re in your late 20s. Everyone knows it’s a safe bet that kids are going to derail your career at least temporarily, if not permanently. You frequently police how often you mention family at all for fear people will assume you’re expecting a kid soon…

… Does this begin to explain it, at all? Even when a company is open to women working in all areas and no one is a dick, there is still a lot of pervasive bias that affects how women are treated and perceived. Why would you notice? It doesn’t affect you.

Electrostaticrain (Reddit)

not really a fan of things that flip the parties around involved, but sadly, most people seem to be incapable of caring about a problem until they can imagine it happening to them

(Source: acodetojoy)

Posted 7 months ago
(TW: RAPE) If a woman has (the right to abortion), why shouldn’t a man be free to use his superior strength to force himself on a woman? At least the rapist’s pursuit of sexual freedom doesn’t (in most cases) result in anyone’s death.

A Republican elected official in Maine actually said this. But what war on women? (via whitegirlpolitickin)

I can’t….

(via stfueverything)

I think this is something I’m going to point people to when I tell them that the pro-life position is directly related to rape culture. 

(via stfufauxminists)

I… the pursuit of sexual freedom isn’t even what abortion is really about? How are so many dumbasses in charge of things??

(Source: )

Posted 7 months ago

It was 2 a.m., just a few days before Christmas, in a remote part of Afghanistan. Eight hours into a 16-hour shift, Ryan, a 23-year-old American naval sailor, was standing tense and alert, watching the footage of soldiers undertaking a nearby mission on a screen in front of him.

Suddenly, a hand clapped onto his back. Wheeling around to look at the face of his senior officer, Ryan knew the moment he had feared had come: His superiors had found out that his enlisted paperwork described him as female. Within three hours, he was on a plane.

The Courage of Transgender Soldiers, a piece from yesterday’s New York Times written by Julia Baird. Pretty cool to see a major newspaper covering trans military service beyond breaking news. Thoughts?

(Source: gaywrites)