Posted 6 minutes ago
jhenne-bean:

smidgetz:

thisisqueenesther:

smidgetz:

goldacrylicnails:

duckindolans:

rachelstewartjewelry:



BETTY BOOP - OriginMs. ESTHER JONES, known by her stage name, “Baby Esther,” was an ” African-American singer and entertainer of the late 1920s. She performed regularly at the (The Cotton Club) in Harlem. Singer Helen Kane saw her act in 1928 and (COPIED or stole ). Ms Jones’ ‘baby’ Singing Style! > for a recording of “I Wanna Be Loved By You.” Ms. Jones’ singing style went on to become the inspiration for (( Max Fleischer )) cartoon character’s Voice and SINGING style of BETTY BOOP, was YES a Black Woman. Her singing trademark Was.. “boop oop a doop “.. In a baby voice at the cotton club in Harlem. - Esther Jones who’s stage name was “Baby Esther” was a popular entertainer at Harlem’s Cotton Club in the late 1920s. Baby Esther interpolated words such as ‘Boo-Boo-Boo’ & ‘Doo-Doo-Doo’ in songs at a cabaret. Helen Kane SAW Baby’s act in 1928 and (stole) Used it in her hit song I Wanna Be Loved By You.An early test sound film was also discovered, which featured Baby Esther performing in this style, disproving Kane’s claims. Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928. Supreme Court Judge Edward J. McGoldrick ruled: “The plaintiff has failed to sustain either cause of action by proof of sufficient probative force”. In his opinion, the “baby” technique of singing did not originate with Kane.$250,000 infringement lawsuitEsther’s manager also testified that , Helen Kane & her manager , saw Baby’s act somewhere between 1928-1929.Scholar Robert G.O’ Meally said, Betty Boop The WHITE CARTOON herself had, as it were, a BLACK grandmother in her backround.Baby Esther was presumed dead by 1934, just when the lawsuit had ended.@Learn your History or they will Hide it from you.@BLACK-American MUSIC and DANCE Styles. - Influential WorldWide “



don’t forget that Betty Boop was a major influence in Osamu Tezuka’s work. Tezuka is considered one of the fathers of modern anime with the “big doe eyes” style so to some extent all anime girls nowadays owe part of their legacy to this lady!

This was not her???
She was a darker skinned Black woman, who is this???


This picture pops up for her as well.

The photo directly above is Baby Esther. The darker skinned woman you’re referring to would be Little Esther, an R&B singer from the 50s. And Helen Kane (the Betty Boop imitation at the top) is a thief. (Hopefully this tumblr entry will clear up some confusion.)

The mystery is solved y’all. So many twists and turns though, thanks Queen Esther for breaking it down.

“Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928.”
white people stay stealing i cannot deal with this

jhenne-bean:

smidgetz:

thisisqueenesther:

smidgetz:

goldacrylicnails:

duckindolans:

rachelstewartjewelry:

BETTY BOOP - Origin

Ms. ESTHER JONES, known by her stage name, “Baby Esther,” was an ” African-American singer and entertainer of the late 1920s. She performed regularly at the (The Cotton Club) in Harlem. 

Singer Helen Kane saw her act in 1928 and (COPIED or stole ). Ms Jones’ ‘baby’ Singing Style! > for a recording of “I Wanna Be Loved By You.” 

Ms. Jones’ singing style went on to become the inspiration for (( Max Fleischer )) cartoon character’s Voice and SINGING style of BETTY BOOP, was YES a Black Woman. 

Her singing trademark Was.. “boop oop a doop “.. In a baby voice at the cotton club in Harlem. - 
Esther Jones who’s stage name was “Baby Esther” was a popular entertainer at Harlem’s Cotton Club in the late 1920s. Baby Esther interpolated words such as ‘Boo-Boo-Boo’ & ‘Doo-Doo-Doo’ in songs at a cabaret. 
Helen Kane SAW Baby’s act in 1928 and (stole) Used it in her hit song I Wanna Be Loved By You.

An early test sound film was also discovered, which featured Baby Esther performing in this style, disproving Kane’s claims. Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928. 

Supreme Court Judge Edward J. McGoldrick ruled: “The plaintiff has failed to sustain either cause of action by proof of sufficient probative force”. In his opinion, the “baby” technique of singing did not originate with Kane.

$250,000 infringement lawsuit

Esther’s manager also testified that , Helen Kane & her manager , saw Baby’s act somewhere between 1928-1929.
Scholar Robert G.O’ Meally said, Betty Boop The WHITE CARTOON herself had, as it were, a BLACK grandmother in her backround.

Baby Esther was presumed dead by 1934, just when the lawsuit had ended.

@Learn your History or they will Hide it from you.
@BLACK-American MUSIC and DANCE Styles. - Influential WorldWide “

don’t forget that Betty Boop was a major influence in Osamu Tezuka’s work. Tezuka is considered one of the fathers of modern anime with the “big doe eyes” style so to some extent all anime girls nowadays owe part of their legacy to this lady!

This was not her???

She was a darker skinned Black woman, who is this???

This picture pops up for her as well.

The photo directly above is Baby Esther. The darker skinned woman you’re referring to would be Little Esther, an R&B singer from the 50s. And Helen Kane (the Betty Boop imitation at the top) is a thief. (Hopefully this tumblr entry will clear up some confusion.)

The mystery is solved y’all. So many twists and turns though, thanks Queen Esther for breaking it down.

Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928.”

white people stay stealing i cannot deal with this

Posted 28 minutes ago

wocinsolidarity:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

African-American Girls & Women Killed By Police: Speak Their Names. See Their Faces. Know Their Stories.

There is this false myth going around that Black women are not victims of police violence. I believe the myth exists because quite frankly the media, social justice organizations and we the public tend not to focus on it. It is a self-fulfilling prophecy. I hope this post will make all of us change our minds. Here are the stories of some of the Black women and girls killed by law enforcement:

Adaisha Miller, Detroit Woman, Hugged Cop From Behind

LAPD cop charged with assault in death of Alesia Thomas

7-year- old Aiyana Stanley-JonesDetroit Free Press

17 Year Old Darnesha Harris Dead after Run-In with Breaux

Mackala Ross and Delores Epps

Eleanor Bumpurs

Erica Collins family files lawsuit against Cincy Police

Pleasant Grove crash claims life of second person | AL.com (Heather Parker)

Family grieves after loved one killed in crash with APD (Jacqueline Culp)

Family of victim question police use of deadly force – KWCH (Karen Day)

Kendra James remembered at Portland rally | KOIN.com

Pedestrian Killed on I-95 in Florida (Laporsha Watson)

After Cleveland shooting, cities restrict police chases(Malissa Williams)

Miriam Carey, Capitol Suspect, Suffered Post-Partum Depression

Elderly Woman Shot & Killed By Hearne Police Officer (Pearlie Golden)

Rekia Boyd Settlement: Family Of Unarmed Chicago Woman

Former Pa. trooper pleads guilty in fatal accident (Robin T. Williams)

Shantel Davis Killed By NYPD Cop In Car Chase | News One

Friends: Woman killed by police was nonviolent | Las Vegas (Sharmel Edwards)

Suspected Walmart Shoplifter Shot To Death In Front Of Kids (Shelly Frey)

The NYPD’s Poor Judgment With the Mentally Ill | Village Voice (Shereese Francis)

Harrisburg woman identified as victim in police SUV crash (Shulena S. Weldon)

$2.5M settlement in shooting of Lima woman by police officer (Tarika Wilson)

No Charges in Killing of Tyisha MillerLos Angeles Times

Texas Police Admit Officer Shot & Killed Unarmed Woman (Yvette Smith)

!!!

Posted 29 minutes ago

I asked seven anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians if they would rather have been a typical Indian or a typical European in 1491. None was delighted by the question, because it required judging the past by the standards of today—a fallacy disparaged as “presentism” by social scientists. But every one chose to be an Indian. Some early colonists gave the same answer. Horrifying the leaders of Jamestown and Plymouth, scores of English ran off to live with the Indians. My ancestor shared their desire, which is what led to the trumped-up murder charges against him—or that’s what my grandfather told me, anyway.

As for the Indians, evidence suggests that they often viewed Europeans with disdain. The Hurons, a chagrined missionary reported, thought the French possessed “little intelligence in comparison to themselves.” Europeans, Indians said, were physically weak, sexually untrustworthy, atrociously ugly, and just plain dirty. (Spaniards, who seldom if ever bathed, were amazed by the Aztec desire for personal cleanliness.) A Jesuit reported that the “Savages” were disgusted by handkerchiefs: “They say, we place what is unclean in a fine white piece of linen, and put it away in our pockets as something very precious, while they throw it upon the ground.” The Micmac scoffed at the notion of French superiority. If Christian civilization was so wonderful, why were its inhabitants leaving?

Like people everywhere, Indians survived by cleverly exploiting their environment. Europeans tended to manage land by breaking it into fragments for farmers and herders. Indians often worked on such a grand scale that the scope of their ambition can be hard to grasp. They created small plots, as Europeans did (about 1.5 million acres of terraces still exist in the Peruvian Andes), but they also reshaped entire landscapes to suit their purposes. A principal tool was fire, used to keep down underbrush and create the open, grassy conditions favorable for game. Rather than domesticating animals for meat, Indians retooled whole ecosystems to grow bumper crops of elk, deer, and bison. The first white settlers in Ohio found forests as open as English parks—they could drive carriages through the woods. Along the Hudson River the annual fall burning lit up the banks for miles on end; so flashy was the show that the Dutch in New Amsterdam boated upriver to goggle at the blaze like children at fireworks. In North America, Indian torches had their biggest impact on the Midwestern prairie, much or most of which was created and maintained by fire. Millennia of exuberant burning shaped the plains into vast buffalo farms. When Indian societies disintegrated, forest invaded savannah in Wisconsin, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, and the Texas Hill Country. Is it possible that the Indians changed the Americas more than the invading Europeans did? “The answer is probably yes for most regions for the next 250 years or so” after Columbus, William Denevan wrote, “and for some regions right up to the present time.”

Quoted from the essay "1941" written by Charles C. Mann, about the major impact that Native Americans had on the Americas (ecologically and culturally) before white people invaded, bringing their diseases and shoving Christianity down the Indians’ throats and murdering them and banning their cultures.

Check out the whole piece (which is rather long). (P.S thanks to @cazalis for sending me this great link)

another excerpt:

Human history, in Crosby’s interpretation, is marked by two world-altering centers of invention: the Middle East and central Mexico, where Indian groups independently created nearly all of the Neolithic innovations, writing included. The Neolithic Revolution began in the Middle East about 10,000 years ago. In the next few millennia humankind invented the wheel, the metal tool, and agriculture. The Sumerians eventually put these inventions together, added writing, and became the world’s first civilization. Afterward Sumeria’s heirs in Europe and Asia frantically copied one another’s happiest discoveries; innovations ricocheted from one corner of Eurasia to another, stimulating technological progress. Native Americans, who had crossed to Alaska before Sumeria, missed out on the bounty. “They had to do everything on their own,” Crosby says. Remarkably, they succeeded.

When Columbus appeared in the Caribbean, the descendants of the world’s two Neolithic civilizations collided, with overwhelming consequences for both. American Neolithic development occurred later than that of the Middle East, possibly because the Indians needed more time to build up the requisite population density. Without beasts of burden they could not capitalize on the wheel (for individual workers on uneven terrain skids are nearly as effective as carts for hauling), and they never developed steel. But in agriculture they handily outstripped the children of Sumeria. Every tomato in Italy, every potato in Ireland, and every hot pepper in Thailand came from this hemisphere. Worldwide, more than half the crops grown today were initially developed in the Americas.

Maize, as corn is called in the rest of the world, was a triumph with global implications. Indians developed an extraordinary number of maize varieties for different growing conditions, which meant that the crop could and did spread throughout the planet. Central and Southern Europeans became particularly dependent on it; maize was the staple of Serbia, Romania, and Moldavia by the nineteenth century. Indian crops dramatically reduced hunger, Crosby says, which led to an Old World population boom.

Along with peanuts and manioc, maize came to Africa and transformed agriculture there, too. “The probability is that the population of Africa was greatly increased because of maize and other American Indian crops,” Crosby says. “Those extra people helped make the slave trade possible.” Maize conquered Africa at the time when introduced diseases were leveling Indian societies. The Spanish, the Portuguese, and the British were alarmed by the death rate among Indians, because they wanted to exploit them as workers. Faced with a labor shortage, the Europeans turned their eyes to Africa. The continent’s quarrelsome societies helped slave traders to siphon off millions of people. The maize-fed population boom, Crosby believes, let the awful trade continue without pumping the well dry.

Back home in the Americas, Indian agriculture long sustained some of the world’s largest cities. The Aztec capital of Tenochtitlán dazzled Hernán Cortés in 1519; it was bigger than Paris, Europe’s greatest metropolis. The Spaniards gawped like hayseeds at the wide streets, ornately carved buildings, and markets bright with goods from hundreds of miles away. They had never before seen a city with botanical gardens, for the excellent reason that none existed in Europe. The same novelty attended the force of a thousand men that kept the crowded streets immaculate. (Streets that weren’t ankle-deep in sewage! The conquistadors had never heard of such a thing.) Central America was not the only locus of prosperity. Thousands of miles north, John Smith, of Pocahontas fame, visited Massachusetts in 1614, before it was emptied by disease, and declared that the land was “so planted with Gardens and Corne fields, and so well inhabited with a goodly, strong and well proportioned people … [that] I would rather live here than any where.”

and another excerpt:

In as yet unpublished research the archaeologists Eduardo Neves, of the University of São Paulo; Michael Heckenberger, of the University of Florida; and their colleagues examined terra preta in the upper Xingu, a huge southern tributary of the Amazon. Not all Xingu cultures left behind this living earth, they discovered. But the ones that did generated it rapidly—suggesting to Woods that terra preta was created deliberately. In a process reminiscent of dropping microorganism-rich starter into plain dough to create sourdough bread, Amazonian peoples, he believes, inoculated bad soil with a transforming bacterial charge. Not every group of Indians there did this, but quite a few did, and over an extended period of time.

When Woods told me this, I was so amazed that I almost dropped the phone. I ceased to be articulate for a moment and said things like “wow” and “gosh.” Woods chuckled at my reaction, probably because he understood what was passing through my mind. Faced with an ecological problem, I was thinking, the Indians fixed it. They were in the process of terraforming the Amazon when Columbus showed up and ruined everything.

(via badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

This barely even touches on some of the differences in agriculture and forestry practices. Where I’m from, if you don’t have people managing the undergrowth with controlled burns, etc., you basically get temperate jungle. Combine that with widespread settler deforestation in the past for timber so it’s mostly secondary growth forest, and you’ve got a difficult to use mess, lower biodiversity because some things just get choked out and other things need periodic burning to germinate, and a lot of forest fires whenever it gets dry wherever people have not been able to continue traditional forest management.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_mixed_mesophytic_forests

I was also surprised at the big deal made out of the tierra prieta “discovery”, though I probably should not have been. There are still a lot of common assumptions going that indigenous people must have been just plain stupid because they were not doing things in exactly the same ways as invading Europeans—and were obviously so inferior in general. But, people also used similar practices elsewhere to enrich soil. Where I’m from, some people still haul rich cove humus (along with ashes) to improve garden soil. I have helped my Nana with that.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cove_(Appalachian_Mountains)

In that case, you get particularly rich soil from sometimes meters-deep layers of leaf mold collecting over the years/centuries, no doubt with its own distinctive microorganism communities. It doesn’t just add more organic material to areas of clay soil, but AFAICT acts very similarly to the tierra prieta. And I am sure that’s not the only area in North America where people figured out some similar ways of enriching soil. (Besides using river bottoms full of rich silt and built-in irrigation for growing staple crops, for incredible yields. And so forth.)

Because they were not stupid.

(via clatterbane)

Posted 38 minutes ago

dalishpeach:

Tender-hearted heroes are so important to me.

Heroes that are soft-spoken and kind, that want nothing more than to take care of everyone.

Heroes that are sweet and good, that always leave folks smiling in their wake.

Heroes that see good in everyone, who want to be good to everyone.

Heroes that are gentle and compassionate, that wish to share the boundless joy in their hearts with the world.

Posted 43 minutes ago

huffingtonpost:

Famous Women Point Out Exactly Why Leaking Nude Photos Is So Very Wrong

This past Sunday, a 4chan user posted nude and revealing photos online, supposedly hacked from the iCloud accounts of numerous female celebrities such as Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton, Lea Michele and more. While some outlets have reported this leak as a juicy celebrity “scandal,” it’s more accurately described as a sex crime.

For more celebrity reactions including Mary E. Winstead and Kirsten Dunst go here. 

Posted 1 hour ago

alloutorg:

Tumblr, we need you! A rogue Arizona State representative, John Kavanagh, wants to pass a bill that would thow trans people in jail for using public restrooms. Anyone could be asked for I.D. to “prove” their gender, and if there’s a discrepancy they could face a fine or jailtime.

When asked why the bill targeted trans people, Kavanagh explained that it’s because he thinks “they’re weird.” Outrageous.

We can stop this bill by taking action at www.allout.org/arizona and spreading the word far and wide. Will you help?

Posted 1 hour ago

bellecosby:

White men can take nations but they can’t take a joke

Posted 1 hour ago

Better Identification of Viking Corpses Reveals: Half of the Warriors Were Female | Tor.com

tropesarenotbad:

juliedillon:

bisexualpiratequeen:

"Researchers at the University of Western Australia decided to revamp the way they studied Viking remains. Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. (Female remains were identified by their oval brooches, and not much else.) By studying osteological signs of gender within the bones themselves, researchers discovered that approximately half of the remains were actually female warriors, given a proper burial with their weapons.”

Women have always fought. We have always been there, ‘contributing to history’. Our own, modern sexism contributes to the erasure of it.

(Bolding mine)

"We have always been there, ‘contributing to history’. Our own, modern sexism contributes to the erasure of it."

Anthropology just loves butchering things

Posted 1 hour ago
White people are not afraid of “white genocide” they are afraid of whiteness being de-centered from the very fabric of our society and no longer being held as the standard for humanity.
Trixstra (via theracismrepellent)
Posted 4 hours ago

osheamobile:

fozmeadows:

karenhealey:

moniquill:

Oh honey, that’s just how old houses are. They settle. They sometimes creak or groan, or quietly weep, or demand blood sacrifice in voices that sounds like the fluttering wings of a thousand moths. It’s just the house settling. For whatever it can get. Go back to sleep.

I am trying to sleep you fascinating menace

so am I, the house whispers, yet you infest my skin, you sweat and dream within the wooden chambers of my heart, a frail, soft jonah I did not consent to swallow, and to which god then shall you pray for release, when all my doors are gone? you fear the dark, little moth, and yet you have locked yourself within a blackness lacking even stars. I was void, but you gave me substance; and who is to say where your soul goes, when you sleep within me? who is to say I do not replace it, do not weave you into my walls and wear your borrowed shell? when daylight comes, all shadows flee but those we carry with us.

wake, then, and see what you cast. 

It’s just the house settling.

It wanted better from its life. More from its occupants. Maybe an addition for a screen porch, or an in-ground pool. Maybe a family that didn’t always leave the lights on when they left a room, or ones that didn’t slam the windows closed so hard.

It had dreams, once. It wanted to be a set piece in a Vincent Price movie, or the filmed-on-location location for the Full House spin-off. It wanted to be the party house for a millionaire music star, with paparazzi camped outside in its bushes at all times.

It doesn’t hate the family that lives in it now, of course. It doesn’t begrudge them their menial life, their 4AM raids on Warcraft, the stuck screen door that they never got around to fixing. It doesn’t complain too much that its garage never gets cleaned out properly, allowing the detritus of generations to clutter its corners.

It had dreams, once. But its life isn’t all that bad, it decided. So it’s settling.

Posted 12 hours ago

fozmeadows:

karenhealey:

moniquill:

Oh honey, that’s just how old houses are. They settle. They sometimes creak or groan, or quietly weep, or demand blood sacrifice in voices that sounds like the fluttering wings of a thousand moths. It’s just the house settling. For whatever it can get. Go back to sleep.

I am trying to sleep you fascinating menace

so am I, the house whispers, yet you infest my skin, you sweat and dream within the wooden chambers of my heart, a frail, soft jonah I did not consent to swallow, and to which god then shall you pray for release, when all my doors are gone? you fear the dark, little moth, and yet you have locked yourself within a blackness lacking even stars. I was void, but you gave me substance; and who is to say where your soul goes, when you sleep within me? who is to say I do not replace it, do not weave you into my walls and wear your borrowed shell? when daylight comes, all shadows flee but those we carry with us.

wake, then, and see what you cast. 

Posted 19 hours ago

zzzeal:

Shoutout to all the artists on Tumblr who work on something for weeks and only get 4 notes

Shoutout to all the artists on Youtube who do amazing speedpaints and, if they’re lucky, will get 500 views

Shoutout to all underappreciated artists who do amazing work and receive no recognition

Posted 20 hours ago
kyubiisaan:

lowwbloods:

officialwillowpape:

i searched up ‘hurdlers without hurdles’ on google and i dont regret it

these boots are made for walkin

The ol razzle dazzle

kyubiisaan:

lowwbloods:

officialwillowpape:

i searched up ‘hurdlers without hurdles’ on google and i dont regret it

these boots are made for walkin

The ol razzle dazzle

Posted 20 hours ago

Oh honey, that’s just how old houses are. They settle. They sometimes creak or groan, or quietly weep, or demand blood sacrifice in voices that sounds like the fluttering wings of a thousand moths. It’s just the house settling. For whatever it can get. Go back to sleep.

Posted 20 hours ago

sully-s:

This is my mermaid and officer OCs for a comic I’m writing.